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All smartbuydisc.rus > World News Nonsense > Brexit ???? > Brexit ???? (page 2)
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Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jul 6 2016 : 10:48AM
Here's another
13620976_10153873901144702_169372725294518122_n.jpg
 
All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
13913 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jul 7 2016 : 1:02AM
The more I watch the going-ons, the more I think of The Mouse That Roared, where the fictional small country declares war on the United States purely for financial gain, and then, to their horror, winds up actually "winning".

Senior Member

tGrump has no shortage of assholes.
6974 Posts
11/13
Posted - Jul 7 2016 : 2:14AM
The dog that caught the car.

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jul 8 2016 : 10:04AM
Right. Its the Conservative leadership/New Prime Minister contest between Teresa May. (Immigration tripled under her watch as Home Secretary) Cannot be trusted with targets
and
Andrea Leadsom who allegedly has a "dodgy" CV. Something dodgy regarding Tax Havens.
One thing for certain. It's going to be a woman PM.
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All-Star Member

111 Posts
9/10
Posted - Jul 9 2016 : 1:14AM
Is anyone in the UK discussing what will be done about agriculture? Most of rural England seemed to vote for brexit, but they will be unhappy if an "independent" UK cannot or will not continue with the huge subsidies paid to farmers.

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Mar 29 2017 : 9:52AM
"I've read the document. I don't like the wording. I'm not going to sign this"
index.jpg

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Mar 29 2017 : 10:40AM
^^ Once we're out, it will be up to whatever government is in power to decide what, if any, subsidies are paid to farmers. That's the trouble (or one of the troubles) with the brexit argument. Their big referendum buses all said how much money we could spend on the NHS once we're not paying money to the EU, but no one can guarantee that any future government will use ANY of that money for the NHS; or farmers, or schools, or public services, or scientific research or anything else. Nothing will be enshrined permanently in law and any new government will be able to change everything the previous government did.
But we've evoked article 50 now. We will exit from the EU in two years (or less if everything is in place quickly)(or more if more time is needed and all the EU states agree to an extension). The real period of uncertainty starts now, and we know how much investors hate uncertainty. Hold your breath UK and start praying (a bit difficult when you're holding your breath but you know what I mean).

Senior Member

1386 Posts
3/06
Posted - Mar 31 2017 : 11:31PM
Do you believe this actually exists anywhere?

Senior Member

tGrump has no shortage of assholes.
6974 Posts
11/13
Posted - Apr 1 2017 : 1:16AM
Edited by - Pieps on 4/1/2017 1:17:34 AM
 
All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
13913 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 2:16AM
BuMp
Maybe it's NOT happening....?

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 4:10AM
I hear that Teresa May will send the
Conservative and
Unionist
Negotiating
Team
to Brussels on Great Britain's behalf regarding Brexit. I hope they don't use the short version of their title when addressing the CUNT's.
Edited by - Brummie on 6/10/2017 6:16:54 AM

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 6:31AM
I like the acronym. However if both the Tories and the DUP form a negotiting team, they'll be at each other's throat. Teresa wants hard Brexit; DUP want open borders.
 
All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
13913 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 6:33AM
UKIP and Paul Nuttall lost all their seats. Not some -- ALL.

Member

82 Posts
10/15
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 9:55AM
Didn't they only have 1 to begin with?
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All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
13913 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 2:52PM
^
They had the one in Parliament and three in the House of Commons. So yeah it wasn't that far to fall. I think it's when you look at the voting totals is how bad the election was. 12.6% share in 2015, 2% last week.


Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jun 10 2017 : 3:03PM
^ Nuttall actually finished 3rd behind Conservative and Labour in his own vote. Boston & Skegness 3.308

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Jun 12 2017 : 10:01AM
I always suspected that UKIP wouldn't last past the referendum. They achieved their aim and it's hard to see what relevance they now have. They aren't needed at the negotiations and their presence on the negotiating team would be counter-productive after Farage's post-referendum rant in the European Parliament.

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jun 12 2017 : 1:16PM
UKIP were a one issue party. To get Britain out of the EU. That's been done. There were differing views within that party as to the type of Brexit needed as there are in the other parties. At least the other main parties have issues broadly agreed upon. If they continue as a party and there is another Election the vote number will drop even further.

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jun 27 2017 : 4:09AM
I've just thought of a brilliant idea for the negotiations of Brexit. Apparently the DUP are great at negotiating so let them conduct the negotiations.

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Jun 28 2017 : 6:21AM
^Christ I hope that's a joke!

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jun 28 2017 : 8:27AM
^ Yes mate. It was.

Senior Member

tGrump has no shortage of assholes.
6974 Posts
11/13
Posted - Mar 5 2018 : 1:23AM

Senior Member

Heretic, Iconoclast, Skeptic
5797 Posts
8/03
Posted - Mar 18 2018 : 3:15AM
It breaks my heart that the country of my birth has allowed itself to be crippled by a minority of pig-ignorant, stupid bigots.
Even though I am a still a citizen, I was not permitted to vote in the referendum.

Senior Member

2939 Posts
2/15
Posted - Mar 30 2018 : 1:33AM
So there are anti-brexit street marches, and a "strategy ... to exploitt [PM Theresa] May’s lack of a majority in the Commons to vote down the Brexit deal in autumn this year while agitating for a second referendum."
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All-Star Member

Literotica.com - grover10
28915 Posts
11/04
Posted - Jul 9 2018 : 9:44AM
 
All-Star Member

Literotica.com - grover10
28915 Posts
11/04
Posted - Jul 9 2018 : 11:48AM

Lord of Lust

az-mo-day-us
14079 Posts
10/01
Posted - Jul 10 2018 : 1:19AM
 
All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
13913 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jul 11 2018 : 5:22PM
But Muslims!

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jul 12 2018 : 12:50AM
The European question has always been the death knell for many a Conservative Prime Minister in one way or another.
Winston Churchill lost the 1945 Election when he thought that having been the British leader during the Second World War it obviously touched on Europe regarding Hitler. Surely they would vote for him during times of Peace. But the Labour Party with Clement Atlee won a landslide.
Edward Heath took Britain into the Common Market but soon after was voted out in favour of Harold Wilson.
Margaret Thatcher was ousted as a result of the decisions regarding Europe.
John Major was voted out similarly
David Cameron brought back a dud deal then put it to a referendum and lost. Where is he by the way?. Lol
Now May is in trouble.
The Conservatives traditionally broadly agree on the economic matters, trade, finance but when it comes to European matters they always shoot themselves in the foot.

Lord of Lust

az-mo-day-us
14079 Posts
10/01
Posted - Jul 12 2018 : 2:56AM
Does the UK have a British version of Donald Trump? If so, they could really use him right now.
MAKE GREAT BRITAIN GREAT AGAIN!
 
All-Star Member

Literotica.com - grover10
28915 Posts
11/04
Posted - Jul 12 2018 : 9:06AM
^ Yes, they do. It, too, is also full of hot air, wears a diaper and is ready to set sail soon.
Baby FM45.jpg
As you can see from the picture, the UK's version is already tantrumming as people are trying to contain him. Like the US version, the UK version also wears a diaper to collect all the shit that comes out of him, as previously stated.
If you are asking about a real person, God help the UK if they do! Really!

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jul 13 2018 : 1:05AM
Astonishingly I agree with Trump about saying Boris Johnson should be Prime Minister. I mean, at least he voted to leave the EU. May voted to stay in the EU and has had to change her mindset into making the best deal for leaving. Someone like Johnson, Gove or Davis as Prime Minister could at least set out their vision for a UK out of the EU.

Senior Member

tGrump has no shortage of assholes.
6974 Posts
11/13
Posted - Jul 13 2018 : 1:09AM
Really?
You need someone who has bad ideas so they can fully plan out and execute the bad ideas?

Senior Member

tGrump has no shortage of assholes.
6974 Posts
11/13
Posted - Jul 13 2018 : 1:13AM
What makes you think they have a vision?
Sometimes the idea to tear down something isn't really followed by an idea of how to then proceed in any good way.
It's hard and takes time to build a house. It's easier to burn one down.
People who can manage to burn down a house don't necessarily have the skills to replace it. It's not their 'thing'.

Senior Member

3149 Posts
1/09
Posted - Jul 13 2018 : 1:48AM
The trouble is Britain has a leader who voted with 48% of the voting population. I only said my last post because you would think if would voted a certain way and then won the election/referendum. You might have a version of Brexit in your head. Having a leader who voted the other way would have to change their thinking 180 degrees.
In one way May is similar to Trump who is the American President but vote by vote across the country it would have apparently been Clinton.

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Jul 14 2018 : 9:35AM
The UK doesn't have a two party system so it's harder for one party to get over half the votes cast. The last time that happened apparently was 1931! So it's easy to point the finger and say that more people voted against the government than for it.

Senior Member

2939 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jul 15 2018 : 3:56AM
Sorry to take this off-topic, but this does actually involve the "coalition of the willing". Prior to the Gulf War II invasion of Iraq, my country's intelligence agencies had made assessments of what would happen in Iraq if the US overthrew the Saddam regime. The assessments concluded there would be little possibility of a stable Iraq; and the different factions would most likely descend the country into civil war. This was of course all hidden at the time, and came out afterwards.

Senior Member

Carryin', contrarian, libertarian
10183 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jul 15 2018 : 1:35PM
Seen on Twitter, gets into conspirism, but still makes you go "Hmm?":
Possibility 1: May, a Remainer, is intentionally negotiating a Brexit deal so bad remaining in the EU looks like a much better option and Remain would likely win a second referendum.
Possibility 2: May, a Remainer, is negotiating toward a "Brexmain" in which the UK will officially depart the EU but will continue to function largely as part of the EU in a diminished capacity.
 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Jul 15 2018 : 3:13PM
^ Why would the EU negotiate a deal that rewards the UK for leaving? That wouldn't make any sense.

Senior Member

tGrump has no shortage of assholes.
6974 Posts
11/13
Posted - Jul 15 2018 : 4:25PM
Okay, I'll go, "Hmm?"
It's not really in the EU's best interest for Britain to leave.
That's the whole point of a voluntary beneficial union or compact between countries. Everyone benefits.
If Britain could officially leave, but in separate arrangements negotiate substantially similar mutually beneficial agreements on trade, travel, etc., I can see that being a thing.
Doesn't that sound familiar? Politicians forced to keep something, but chipping away at it, or forced to eliminate something, but re-instituting it in bits and pieces? In this case, it seems a necessity.

Senior Member

Carryin', contrarian, libertarian
10183 Posts
1/08
Posted - Jul 15 2018 : 5:37PM
You need to read a little better. In neither scenario does the UK actually leave the EU in function. In the "Brexmain" scenario the UK goes through the motions of looking like it's leaving while in actuality remaining in. The EU gets what it wants while allowing exit window dressing.

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Jul 16 2018 : 5:40AM
The EU will want a deal that is best for the remaining member states. If it happens to favour the UK as well so much the better, but ultimately the EU holds the stronger hand so whatever the UK government puts before Parliament is subject first to Parliament approving it, which isn't a gimme, and second to the EU accepting it, which certainly isn't a gimme.
What I find difficult to fathom is how Teresa May continually stated that 'Brexit means Brexit' and yet puts forward a proposed deal that means anything but. It's sort of 'we're coming out of the single market, but sort of aren't; and there'll be no customs union, but there sort of will.' God knows what this is all going to look like once it's sorted.
 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Jul 16 2018 : 10:05AM
Perhaps, but I was addressing the suggestion that the UK would leave, but get to keep all the goodies, or, as you say, not 'actually leave the EU in function.' I don't see the benefit to the EU with going through the rigamarole.

Member

118 Posts
6/16
Posted - Aug 2 2018 : 11:27PM
Britain has been in The EU in one form or another for 45 years. In that time British laws and European laws have become intertwined in a great many areas. If there is a complete break, the so-called 'Hard Brexit' absolute chaos is going to ensue. Those who voted for Brexit have got virtually all they wanted, yet now they're jumping up and down screaming they have been betrayed. It's the biggest disaster to hit the country for 70 years and they just say fuck that, we don't care, bring it on! Now we've got Trump's lackeys over here trying to stir things up. It's all one mother and father of a fuck-up!

Senior Member

Heretic, Iconoclast, Skeptic
5797 Posts
8/03
Posted - Aug 4 2018 : 9:41AM
The EU would keep all of the benefits of free trade and free movement with Britain, but Britain would no longer have any say in EU laws or a vote in the European Parliament. This might be seen as a win by the EU.
As an added benefit, they would avoid re-igniting the civil war in Ireland, something that the EU citizens in Eire would likely appreciate.
Possibly also, the UK would escape from European human rights laws, which the Tories would see as a win, as they could resume their hobby of stamping on the faces of British workers.
 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Aug 4 2018 : 10:27AM
Thanks, I appreciate the reply.

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Aug 28 2018 : 6:22AM
^^ The thing is that the UK can't have its cake and eat it. The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, says frictionless trade between the EU and U.K. is only possible through the “Norway plus” model, where Britain would be able to stay in the single market, but would have to accept free movement of people, EU laws and jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Norway isn't in the EU but has the sort of arrangements that you're talking about. In addition to accepting freedom of movement, its arrangement requires it to pay about £400 million in grants to poorer EU countries. The Norwegian PM has said that he can't understand why the UK would want that this sort of agreement.
Freedom of movement is untenable to the UK anyway and the EU will never allow that to happen without full acceptance by the UK of the EU restrictions that the UK voters clearly wanted to abandon in the referendum.
Civil war in Ireland? When was that? The Irish troubles involved terrorists (or freedom fighters if you prefer to call the IRA that; loyalist paramilitiaries on the other side) on both sides fighting it out with out any official support from their respective states. It was never a civil war and I'm not sure how membership of the EU makes any difference either way.
 
All-Star Member

Non Prevalebunt!
12326 Posts
1/05
Posted - Aug 28 2018 : 4:22PM
I'd like to add another point many dumbasses voting in the UK never understood or has not been debated enough , it's a chapter called "Nuclear Weapons" or I should say "Force de Frappe". As you may know the EU has not an Army nor a common strategic view nor common geostrategic policies. We just join when needed. We never did that for a very simple reason: there were two Nuclear Countries in the EU , which one of them should hold the "button bag"? Would they entrust the other with their Nuclear missiles or Nuclear armed submarines and warships? Would they entrust a "European President" with them?
The answer was no , so we stayed separated ,each of us with his own army , navy and air force and, of course, his own foreign policies ,sometimes conflicting with the other EU members even.
Now the only obstacle for the EU to integrate their armies with nuclear capabilities has removed itself.
I think it's odd England and later the British Empire has always fought any raising force in Europe that could undermine its power or even become a potential military threat , this at least since the Hundred Years War , continuing against Spain , Napoleon and Hitler and they're giving basically a green light to a power that includes Spain, France and Germany their former enemies of the last thousand years
did they even thought about it?
Edited by - LCF on 8/28/2018 4:25:06 PM

Senior Member

1044 Posts
1/14
Posted - Aug 29 2018 : 5:44AM
^ I'm not sure the nuclear issue is as important as that when it comes to brexit. Although there are common EU foreign policy initiatives, including military ones, the two nuclear powers - UK and France - each have an independent nuclear 'deterrent'; in other words they don't rely on each other to agree or otherwise in the event that they feel the need to use them. That won't change when the UK leaves. Of course whether in practice either country could really envisage launching nuclear weapons without at least consulting its allies, and NATO definitely comes into play here as well as the EU, is highly doubtful.
The history of Europe has been one of all major countries acting solely in their own interests. They forged and broke alliance with other countries when they felt the need to do so. It wasn't just Britain.
 
All-Star Member

Literotica.com - grover10
28915 Posts
11/04
Posted - Sep 20 2018 : 7:47PM
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