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Posted - Mar 10 2015 : 2:50AM
A poster in the "what are gas prices in your area?" thread mentioned storage.
It's a big deal right now: again, production isn't slowing down much. So there's an oil glut. It's gotta get put somewhere, right?




What I wonder, is, once oil starts to rebound, which it inevitably will, will the costs of all this storage be factored into the rebound prices??
[???]
 
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Posted - Apr 7 2015 : 1:49PM
Another oil price domino effect:
 
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Posted - May 21 2015 : 11:37AM



Larry Summers, a former U.S. treasury secretary recently wrote, "As long as one of our major parties is opposed to essentially all trade agreements, and the other is resistant to funding international organizations, the U.S. will not be in a position to shape the global economic system." I agree with Summers. The most potent forces constraining America’s economic power in the world are coming from Capitol Hill, not Beijing.
 
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Posted - May 21 2015 : 11:58AM
I haven't seen Summers name since his troubles at Harvard. He's an old Clintonite, so maybe Hillary can find a place for him in her administration. As for the content of his remarks, it makes sense to me.
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Posted - Jul 8 2015 : 1:26AM
These low oil prices could be with us for awhile. All the places near me in NoVA went down 4 cents after the July 4th holiday.
It's back to below $53 a barrel.
 
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Posted - Aug 10 2015 : 6:37PM
Almost certainly in part due to falling oil/gas prices.
 
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Posted - Aug 18 2015 : 3:00AM
Only thing is, whatever happens in the US is not going to be exactly like Japan, thanks to immigration. Yes, our population is getting older too, and our birth rates are declining, but neither is happening at a rate like Japan's.
 
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Posted - Aug 18 2015 : 3:07AM
N'er mind
Edited by - Smiler Grogan on 8/18/2015 3:13:08 AM

fubar

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Posted - Aug 18 2015 : 3:13AM
^That's an understatement of how deeply fucked Japan will be soon. Best case is many people starve. Worst is nuclear war with China. Either way, that's another exodus, to Russia, US, Canada, anywhere that will let them in.
 
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Posted - Aug 24 2015 : 9:38AM
Stock market continues its plunge. This is the downside of the low gas -- combined with another problem -- in this case, China -- you get worrying and sell offs.
 
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Posted - Aug 27 2015 : 2:35AM


 
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Posted - Sep 19 2015 : 8:32AM

Joe Nocera
Op-Ed Columnist
SEPT. 18, 2015
“At a time when we want to compete around the world, it is hard to believe what is happening in the U.S. Congress,” said Jeff Immelt, the chief executive of General Electric.
“The ultimate irony is that we are on the verge of an American manufacturing renaissance,” bemoaned Jim McNerney, the chairman of Boeing. “Yet this action is causing companies to start looking outside the U.S. instead.”
“People complain that the bank only helps big companies,” said Doug Oberhelman, the chairman and C.E.O. of Caterpillar. “A lot of our suppliers are small. They don’t export, but we do. And if we aren’t exporting, they aren’t selling to us.” He added, “I find it staggering that we would put highly paid export-oriented jobs at risk.”
What Oberhelman finds “staggering,” Immelt finds “hard to believe” and McNerney finds ironic is the refusal of Republican extremists — led by the House Financial Services Committee’s chairman, Jeb Hensarling — to allow a vote on the reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, a vote that would pass in a landslide. The Ex-Im Bank, which insures and sometimes finances export sales, had to stop making deals at the end of June, when its reauthorization deadline came and went.
Although the Ex-Im Bank still exists, it has been reduced these days to managing its portfolio, rather than underwriting or insuring new deals. According to Boeing, its foreign rival Airbus, which can tap not one but three export credit agencies, is spreading the word to potential aircraft customers that Boeing can no longer compete when bids require sovereign insurance. That is hardly the only such example.
The damage this is doing to our economy is starting to become clear. In recent weeks, Boeing, America’s largest exporter in dollar volume, made two sobering announcements: first, that Asia Broadcast Satellite canceled an $85 million satellite contract expressly because there was no Ex-Im support. (Boeing is hoping to renegotiate.) More recently, Kacific, a Singapore-based satellite company, told Boeing not to bother bidding on a satellite contract, again because of a lack of Ex-Im financing.
As a result, McNerney told me, “layoffs in the hundreds” have taken place in Boeing’s satellite division.
This week, it was G.E.’s turn to make Ex-Im-related news. First, it said it would move 400 jobs to France to manufacture — and export — gas turbines, and 100 final assembly jobs to Hungary and China. Then it said it would create a new turboprop center in Europe that would employ up to 1,000 people. In both cases, G.E. said the moves would allow the company to take advantage of European export credit agencies.
When I spoke to Immelt, McNerney and Oberhelman, whose company also uses the agency, they all sounded astonished that this important tool, which they need to compete with companies abroad, was being taken away for purely ideological reasons.
“If no other country had export financing, that would be one thing,” said Immelt. “But that’s not where the world is. What you are really doing is helping Siemens and China Rail” — companies that rely heavily on their countries’ export financing.
Immelt told me that G.E. currently has $11 billion in potential deals that require export credit agency financing. That’s real money, even for General Electric.
McNerney pointed out that many big deals require export financing for the bid to even be considered. He also noted, ominously, that 10 to 15 percent of Boeing’s aircraft exports are dependent on Ex-Im support. Losing that business would be devastating for the company, and its employees.
When asked about the accusation from the right that the Ex-Im Bank is a classic case of government picking winners and losers, Oberhelman said that “if this doesn’t change, we’re all going to be losers.”
The anti-Ex-Im Bank faction is having a glorious time mocking the G.E. and Boeing announcements. A spokesman for Heritage Action for America, the conservative think tank leading the charge, described G.E.’s moves as “multinational crony capitalism.” Hensarling issued a statement claiming Boeing could finance the satellite deals itself to prevent layoffs; “it just chooses not to.”
And an unidentified financial services committee staffer told Politico that the loss of 500 G.E. jobs was a drop in the bucket for a company that employs 136,000 people in the U.S.
That heartless quote reminded me of an anecdote in “Confidence Men,” Ron Suskind’s book about the Obama administration’s financial team during the president’s first term. Some of Obama’s top advisers wanted to let Chrysler fail. But in a critical meeting, Ron Bloom, a former adviser to the United Steelworkers who was a member of Obama’s Auto Task Force, said, “Mr. President, these are the reasons we can’t kill this company. The damage to these communities and people will never be undone.”
Chrysler was ultimately saved because the president’s advisers suddenly understood that it was their role to save jobs, not to sacrifice them on the altar of economic purity. What will it take for the Republicans to come to the same realization?

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Posted - Sep 19 2015 : 10:36AM
Deindustrialization is inevitable. There's no painless route to it, but there is a difference between planned and crashed.
 
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Posted - Dec 2 2015 : 1:03PM
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Posted - Dec 2 2015 : 1:26PM

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Posted - Dec 2 2015 : 4:01PM
You know that things are going on when China sends jobs to the U.S. for the cheap labor.

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Posted - Dec 3 2015 : 10:01PM
^
The Copper is there.
There is a quarry right up the street the was owned by a Lafarge. Now it's owned by Bluegrass. It was Campbells when I was a kid, than became Genstar.
Been around for 200 years. Side note, the first third of the Washington Monument in Washington DC is was built with stone from this Quarry.
Multinationals want to run these types of businesses.
The jobs are Service, Tech, Healthcare, and University. And are mostly US obviously. You should know that.

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Posted - Dec 4 2015 : 12:11AM
I was kinda joking.
But there are copper mines in China. And the copper mining industry is in a down cycle right now.

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Posted - Dec 7 2015 : 4:08PM
As far as the statistic citing 97% of the poorest counties located in red states, I find it interesting those very people are frequently the most likely to vote Republican. The regressive social planks of the far right of the party seem to have more allure than the increased chances for better economic opportunities.
 
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Posted - Dec 18 2015 : 8:40AM
 
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Posted - Dec 18 2015 : 12:05PM
No government shutdown: Paul Ryan gets $1.1T budget deal that funds government through next September.

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Posted - Dec 18 2015 : 1:33PM
Wow. That's more than nine months!
 
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Posted - Dec 18 2015 : 3:08PM
There is nothing like the allure of a Christmas vacation to get politicians to behave like adults and compromise. Of course, the agreement has lifetime ass Nancy Pelosi all upset.
 
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Posted - Dec 18 2015 : 4:44PM
^ Really? Can you be more specific?
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Posted - Dec 19 2015 : 1:50AM
Uh, yeah...
 
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Posted - Dec 26 2015 : 4:48PM
Alaska has a bit of a dilemma. It's (Which of Course Is Not CALLED Socialism Because They're a Red State ) of getting annual cash payouts from oil companies

Many Alaskans are not old enough to recall times this bad. This is the nation’s least-taxed state, where oil royalties and energy taxes once paid for 90 percent of state functions. Oil money was so plentiful that residents received annual dividend checks from a state savings fund that could total more than $8,000 for a family of four — arriving each autumn, as predictable as the first snowfall

And so, this deeply Republican state is mulling having to, gulp, raise taxes:

Mr. Walker’s recovery plan would take more from residents through the income tax and would give them less as well, by changing the formula under which the dividend is paid. The income tax would be 6 percent of the amount an Alaskan currently pays in federal taxes, so a person who owed $10,000 to the Internal Revenue Service would also need to write a $600 check to Alaska.
Dividend payments would be tied directly to royalties that decrease or increase with oil production. Because oil production is down, next year’s payout would be cut by roughly half under the proposal, to about $1,000 a person. The governor would also raise taxes on alcohol and tobacco and would collect new taxes from the fishing, mining, energy and tourism industries.

 
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Posted - Dec 30 2015 : 2:12AM
How the Rich Avoid Taxes.

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Posted - Jan 2 2016 : 8:32AM
As long as we depend on an antiquated (IRS) tax system to collect revenue there will always be a way around paying your fair share of taxes.We had our kitchen remodeled and paid our contractor cash to get a much better price.
 
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Posted - Jan 2 2016 : 9:55AM
As you know, I already started a thread on this several days ago, which included a link to the original New York Times article
Private Tax System Saves the Wealthiest Billons
While related, I think systemic tax scams is deserving of its own thread (as opposed to "budget battles").
It's when the right-wing starts the "we can't afford it... cut your taxes... we're paying the highest tax rates in the world..." nonsensical mantras, it comes back here
Well, the rich aren't paying their fair share of taxes, and NYT article explains the whole scam.
President Sanders will start to fix the system.
Feel the Bern
 
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Posted - Jan 20 2016 : 8:16PM

JUDY WOODRUFF: Bradley Olson, let’s talk about the oil side of this. What is driving this continued drop in oil prices?
BRADLEY OLSON, The Wall Street Journal: Well, there are two main factors at play.
The first one is a little bit tied to what’s driving the falling stock markets worldwide, and that’s China. China’s sort of always been the golden goose when it comes to oil markets, particularly with demand. China’s about the second largest oil consumer in the world, and so whenever there are indications that the Chinese economy perhaps isn’t going to be as strong as people had expected, it causes a great deal of uncertainty when it comes to oil.
The second factor is Iran. The sanctions are about to be lifted that were imposed by the United States and the European Union, and once those sanctions are up, a lot of people anticipate a significant a amount of oil coming into the market from Iran, perhaps as many this year as 500,000 barrels of oil.
So, the market is already oversupplied, and you’re going to dump additional barrels into the market from Iran. And then you have problems or questions about demand that would have been able to bring up the price. So, there’s just a lot of indicators that are not positive at this time when it comes to the oil market.
JUDY WOODRUFF: So, is it, though, expected that these countries are just going to continue to pump regardless of how low the price is going?
BRADLEY OLSON: That’s right. I mean, one of the things that you see happening when the price goes down is that everybody’s trying to make up for the lost revenue. And so this is something that’s actually happened in the history of oil crashes, is that all the producers and companies actually try to pump more oil because they’re trying to make up for whatever they have been losing by producing more.
In this case, a lot of people expected the U.S. shale companies and U.S. companies that were behind a major boon in production in the last few years to slow down, and they just haven’t done that yet. They have been a lot more resilient than anybody expected.
JUDY WOODRUFF: Liz Ann Sonders, you used the word panic a minute ago. Compare this to what was going on in 2008.
LIZ ANN SONDERS: Oh, I don’t think this resembles 2008 by any stretch, when you think about the proximate cause for that, it was obviously a seizure of the financial system which had global tentacles and the leverage associated with that.
And what we’re seeing now is a bit more concentrated in the commodity space. Leverage in the financial system is significantly lower than it was back then. I think what we’re seeing has a greater analogy to 1998 than it does 2008, where you had an environment where you had major currency disruptions, problems in the emerging markets.
It ultimately caused a tremendous amount of volatility and even a very severe correction in the U.S. stock market, but it didn’t take the financial system nor the U.S. economy down with it, and I think that’s the better analogy than 2008.
Edited by - sMILER gROGAN on 1/20/2016 8:16:44 PM
 
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Posted - Jan 20 2016 : 8:27PM
This whole thing just goes to show there can't really ever be perfect economic conditions. If there's a winner somewhere, there's invariably a loser somewhere else.
 
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Posted - Feb 8 2016 : 1:39AM
It's not just Alaska: [invalid URL removed]Louisiana, Oklahoma and other states are having budget difficulties due to oil's fall:
 
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Posted - Mar 2 2016 : 4:47PM
 
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Posted - Mar 9 2016 : 1:24AM
Last year I talked about how Bobby Jindal's tea party policies wrecked Louisiana and made him unlikely to win the Republican nomination.
Now it has become apparent that And yeah, falling oil prices have a role to play here too...

 
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Posted - Apr 25 2016 : 7:25PM
^
Hey, speaking of Kansas...yep... Snake Plissken wouldn't even dare parachute into that place.
 
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Posted - Jul 27 2016 : 4:02PM
the WSJ:

Refineries have been on a buying spree since crude oil prices began their descent two years ago, giving them cheap feedstock to make gasoline, diesel and other fuels. But while demand for gasoline has been strong, particularly in the U.S., consumption hasnt been enough to mop up all the fuel spilling out of refineries.
The result is near record levels of gasoline put into storage around the world, about 500 million barrels in total, according to Citigroup. Bloated stockpiles have pushed gasoline futures down more than 25% compared with a year ago. Prices at the pump in the U.S. stand at the lowest level for this time of year since 2004.
U.S. inventories of gasoline hit 241 million barrels in the week ended July 15, 11% above a year ago. Even a robust American summer driving season, which would normally send gasoline prices higher and suck up stockpiles of the fuel, is unlikely to make a dent in inventories this time.
"Coming out of the summer, these tanks will still be full," said Mark Benigno, co-director of energy trading at INTL FCStone Inc.

Canadian_Cindy
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Posted - Jul 27 2016 : 8:11PM
.
Edited by - Canadian_Cindy on 7/27/2016 8:15:51 PM
 
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Posted - Oct 1 2016 : 1:09PM


 
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Posted - Dec 7 2016 : 3:44AM
Let's remember this article when Prez Trump offers Ohio companies millions in tax breaks....

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Posted - Dec 7 2016 : 11:36AM
Actually, the budget shortfall is a result of tax breaks.
Cody in 2011:
 
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Posted - Dec 7 2016 : 1:06PM
Oh, how I love the archives!!
 
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Posted - Dec 7 2016 : 1:19PM
^^But on another note, this explains why Dems have such a hard time at state levels:
Step 1) Republicans come in offering sexy tax cuts!
Step 2) In addition to taking away welfare from the Cadillac-driving women with 10 kids, state jobs, education, medicine and infrastructure also take a hit.
Step 3) Democrats: We need to raise taxes!
Step 4) Republicans: Oh My Gosh are these guys for real??? We need MORE tax cuts to get the economy going!!!

Of course, there's also what Kasich is doing:
Step 1) Build up a Rainy Day Fund (admirable!)
Step 2) Do so by starving the cities, which are filled mostly with Dems and serve the 'burbs and rural areas (not so admirable)
Step 3) "Look at the condition that the cities are in! That's Dems for ya!"
Step 4) Republicans get re-elected thanks to depressd Dem turnout and Repubs being hyped up by some wedge issue like a
Wash, Rinse, Repeat.

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Posted - Dec 7 2016 : 6:43PM
^
Yep.
 
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Posted - Dec 16 2016 : 2:37AM
[link inactive:404 - Page not found]Bloomberg: There's Plenty Of Jobs -- What's Needed Are Workers With the Right Skills.

Edited by - Smiler Grogan on 12/16/2016 2:37:28 AM

 
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Posted - Dec 16 2016 : 12:22PM
Again, worth repeating...

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Posted - Dec 16 2016 : 12:55PM
We are stupid.

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Posted - May 31 2017 : 3:47PM
licker wrote:*
On this thread, October of 2013.
 
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Posted - Jun 22 2017 : 2:42PM
An update to my post from December:

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Posted - Jun 24 2017 : 4:20PM
What the numbers illustrate is one of the key problems that has plagued the U.S. labor market in recent years. Job seekers tend to lack the skills in demand, they're not willing to move to jobs that are available, or employers have unrealistic expectations.
Many of these jobs are either high/endless education jobs, or are low pay, part time jobs. Two interviews for a $9.50 an hour retail job?
 
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Posted - Jun 24 2017 : 6:30PM
Oh, it's not perfect. That's the American economy for you. Private industry moves faster than colleges and certainly faster than the average schools can keep up.
And the low rent jobs, well, what can you say...
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