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Posted - Jun 21 2019 : 12:48AM
That's a genericization, like calling all colas "Coke."

Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jun 21 2019 : 5:09AM
^ I think it's still specific to certain national cultures.

It was actually a follow up to this comment on another thread.

Simple Simon:
When I was a kid watching 'Romancing the Stone' Michael Douglas's character kept asking every hotel clerk if they had a 'Xerox' machine. I'd never heard that word; i thought this was some top secret machine he was looking for. I only knew years later.

I know American culture invades the whole world, but I say: no more Kleenex, Hoover, Jacuzzi, Xerox ...

It's tissue, vacuum, hot tub, photocopier 

GGG:  ... I used to say "hoover" to mean the vacuum cleaner but stopped since I moved to the states. 
(link)

 
All-Star Member

Non Prevalebunt!
12335 Posts
1/05
Posted - Jun 21 2019 : 10:41AM
^
Or calling "playstation" every game console

Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jun 21 2019 : 3:41PM
^ A gamer was going on leave and a colleague said: He's happy; he can play Playstatian all day. He yelled at her: XBOX!

^^ Funnilly, I was watching a media show re-run from 2017 and they were talking Amazon's Alexaa and how it will order products for you; and that in America people will have home deliveries for things like a tube of toothpaste (and I've read, a single pizza slice.)

They then discussed that some men are having sexual fantasies about Alexa's voice. A panellist, of North American origin, said: then a box of Kleenex comes right to you.

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Senior Member

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Posted - Jun 29 2019 : 8:15PM
No American's want to answer?

In an American porn pre-scene interview, the director asked the female star if she did ATM? All confused, she replied: "I use my bank card all the time, but what is an ATM?"

 
All-Star Member

Your other left
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Posted - Jun 30 2019 : 12:14AM
^ It is just "the ATM" around here.

Senior Member

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Posted - Jun 30 2019 : 1:04AM
^ Thanks.

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jun 30 2019 : 10:36PM
Does anyone still say "PIN number"?

Senior Member

Less identical crap, more sleaze and bush!
2963 Posts
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Posted - Jun 30 2019 : 10:54PM
soda

Senior Member

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Posted - Jul 1 2019 : 12:49AM
Cookie

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Posted - Jul 3 2019 : 1:17AM
Resized_20190703_151139.jpeg

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 3 2019 : 1:33AM
Have any non-Australians ever heard the term 'bludger'?

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 18 2019 : 8:48PM
^^ I don't know if this is cultural or personal, but I've actually never used the full term 'vacuum cleaner'. I've always ever just called it a 'vacuum'.

(Years ago a salesman came to our home to demonstrate one that cost three and a half thousand dollars. He saw I was all aghast and he said it can only cost you X dollars a week. I said in savings. He said most people do it through finance. I said: "Finance? You want me to take out a loan, to buy a vacuum!")


Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jul 18 2019 : 8:52PM
A Springsteen album track* used the term "torch". I didn't think Americans used that term. Isn't it "flashlight"?

*Gloria's Eyes. Human Touch (1992) "Like a shining torch in Gloria's eyes"

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Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 18 2019 : 8:54PM
American.

Australian: soft drink.

What's the British term?

 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28336 Posts
3/02
Posted - Jul 18 2019 : 9:50PM
We say 'flashlight' to describe the battery-operated portable light Brits call a torch. However, we say that someone in love is 'carrying a torch' for the object of their affection, and my guess is that Springsteen was riffing off of that usage.

Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jul 18 2019 : 11:44PM
^ Thanks. I have heard the term ''carrying a torch'.
I didn't know it was American, and I didn't know it had nothing to do with a portable light bulb.

("Now I'm just a fool in Gloria's eyes"

"Well there was somethin' gone in Gloria's eyes"

"Now I work hard to prove my love is true 
Now I work hard and I bring it on home to you 
At night I pray as silently you lie 
Some day my love again will rise 
Like a shining torch in Gloria's eyes "


Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Jul 19 2019 : 4:36PM
Sadly, we quite often do. And i always have to smother my smirk when someone says it, causing me to think of my own definition - Just about any girl in a Rocco Siffredi movie.

Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Jul 19 2019 : 4:40PM
Outside of a Quidditch match in Harry Potter, I've never heard it in the States. What is a bludger?

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 20 2019 : 11:07PM
^^Thanks
^ Pop culture doesn't really count. From today's paper
Resized_20190721_121650.jpeg

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 21 2019 : 12:34AM
Is the term "dodgy" used in America?

Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Jul 22 2019 : 9:42AM
Yup. Not a LOT, but an American will know what it means right away. In the States, it's used to describe someone who is not trustworthy or sneaky. Or "off", such as "that ground beef, with the gray bits on it, looked a bit dodgy".

Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jul 22 2019 : 7:48PM
^ Thanks. That is the standard definition. I've actually never heard it in American pop culture. (But I did once use it on this site and no one said anything.)

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 23 2019 : 4:07AM
Following on from 'PIN number' and 'ATM machine', why do Americans say 'tuna fish'?
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Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Jul 23 2019 : 9:23AM
Because "you can tune a piano but you can't tuna fish". 🎼
😄

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 23 2019 : 10:32PM
^ Thanks LOL!
I was going to tell you how to make a hormone, but I assume you already know.

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 23 2019 : 10:37PM
And what's the British term for sidewalk/footpath?
Is it walkway?
 
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Your other left
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Posted - Jul 23 2019 : 11:00PM
We say PIN number and ATM machine because few people knew what either a PIN or an ATM was, so, the acronyms got married to the identifiers. The same is probably true of tuna.

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 24 2019 : 8:16AM
^ Thanks. I have to admit, I actually used to say PIN number myself.

^^ Hmmm ... so apparantly in America 'sidewalk' is just for the inner city. The actual American term is 'pavement'.


Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Jul 24 2019 : 9:26AM
In my experience, sidewalk is a concrete walkway, no matter where it is. Pavement can be any paved surface, such as a street, sidewalk, patio, or even playground, i.e., a paved surface. Now, it wouldn't be unheard of for the word usage to be regional, i.e.:

1. Some regions call the thing you put your groceries in a 'bag'. Other regions call it a 'sack'.
2. Some regions call it a 'soda', other regions call it a 'pop'.
3. The words 'highway', 'freeway', and 'expressway' all mean the same thing. Just depends upon where in the country you're at. Just to stir it up a little, in my experience, the Brits call it a 'motorway'.


Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Jul 24 2019 : 11:29PM
^ Thanks. So a footpath is called a sidewalk in America, and a pavement is just any paved path.

On 'Good Times' once, a character said "I don't like the game, but I gotta play ball". I don't think I'd ever heard it before or since. Is this this a common saying in America? I think it's a great saying.


Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Jul 25 2019 : 8:38AM
I've never heard the full saying. I suspect most of that line was dialogue added to the phrase "play ball", which can mean 2 things. The first, which is obvious, is often heard at the beginning of a sports game that involves a ball. It's most commonly heard at a baseball game. Pretty much like "let the game begin". The second means to go along with what's happening. Such as when you don't totally agree with a plan, but you don't want stir up trouble, or you don't have a better plan to offer. So you "play ball", i.e., go along.

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Jul 31 2019 : 5:26AM
^^^ "The words 'highway', 'freeway', and 'expressway' all mean the same thing. Just depends upon where in the country you're at. "

Actually, in Australia 'freeway' and 'highway' have different meanings. A freeway is a road with no stop lights, but street lights; whereas a highway has no street lights.

^ Thanks. I assumed it was a common American saying. In the show, it was used by a boss having to treat black people in an inferior manner.

'I don't like the league but i gotta play ball'.
It should be a common saying. It's great.


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Posted - Aug 1 2019 : 1:56AM
To add to this, in the Northeast, we also have "parkways." These usually, but don't always, have hard shoulders and central reservations like any highway, but they conform to their surrounding geography rather than cut through it. Also, they have low bridges and are only to be used by passenger cars. This last causes trouble whenever a truck driver unwittingly merges onto one, and either has to back up or gets stuck under one of the bridges.

Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Aug 4 2019 : 2:00AM
"It’s an ugly word. Bludger.

It came to us with the convicts. It meant a pimp – a scoundrel from the gin-soaked back lanes of London who lived on the earnings of a prostitute, sometimes wielding a bludgeon to rob her customers.

All these years later, in the hands of experts ... the word is hardly less ugly than its criminal antecedent."

()


Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Aug 4 2019 : 4:32AM
^ From the comments...

jezza99
Australia has picked up all the bad bits of the US. Cruelty and judgementalism to those less fortunate is one of the worst aspects of that country.


Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Aug 5 2019 : 12:07AM
I just saw these sayings today, which I have heard before and are basically the same thing.

- hate the game not the player

- donít hate the player, hate the game


Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Aug 5 2019 : 2:35AM
I just saw these sayings today, which I have heard before and are basically the same thing.

- hate the game not the player

- donít hate the player, hate the game


Senior Member

Less identical crap, more sleaze and bush!
2963 Posts
7/09
Posted - Aug 6 2019 : 5:42AM
Wow that is full on, and a much darker origin to being a dole bludger lol

Senior Member

2956 Posts
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Posted - Aug 17 2019 : 7:48AM
Is aluminium/aluminum the only case where the same word is both spelt differently and pronounced differently?

Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Aug 17 2019 : 4:32PM
^Whoops! I wrote the following before realizing that you wrote "spelt and pronounced differently". I Initially thought you wrote "spelt the same but pronounced differently".
Tomato: To-may-to and to-mah-to I believe potato suffers from the same affliction.
Caribbean: Care-i-bee-an (first syllable is exactly like the word "care") and Car-ib-ee-an
Laboratory: In American everyday speech it's lab-ra-tor-ee. In American monster/horror movies it la-bore-a-tor-ee

Edited by - HumptyRumpty on 8/17/2019 4:34:44 PM


Senior Member

2956 Posts
2/15
Posted - Aug 17 2019 : 5:14PM
^ I actually didn't know that it was spelt differently in America until this smartbuydisc.ru enlightened me.

Trendy words and phrases


Senior Member

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2600 Posts
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Posted - Aug 17 2019 : 5:41PM
Debut - American: DAY-byoo/British: da-BOO
Valet - American: vall-AY/British: VALL-et
Filet - American: fill-AY/British: FILL-et
Premier - American: pre-MIER/British: PREM-ier

That last infuriates me because American soccer fans and commentators will often affect the British pronunciation when referring to the Premier League. I find it unbearable, but it's all of part and parcel of affecting British vernacular in the sport, e.g. "pitch" instead of "field," "kit" instead of "uniform," &c.


Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Aug 19 2019 : 6:06PM
Zebra - American: zee-brah; British: ze-brah

Member

43 Posts
8/18
Posted - Aug 19 2019 : 6:08PM
I always wondered why British narrators on American public television shows would say "aluminum" with that extra "e" sound before the "um". Now I know - because it's spelled that way!

Edited by - HumptyRumpty on 8/19/2019 6:12:44 PM

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