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Senior Member


"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Oct 10 2017 : 1:47PM
You won't believe the of the guy coercing a woman. He just goes on and on with his badgering, and acts as if she is doing him wrong by embarrassing him. Unbefuckinglievable.
before he was fired is interesting, as well. He manages both to imply false claims against him, and to assert that deep therapy will fix things.
-- I haven't read it yet.
By the way, the proper response to a woman not wanting to come sit with you in your hotel room is, "Oh, all right."
Edited by - Pieps on Oct 10 2017
Edited by - Flash on Nov 29 2017
Edited by - Flash on Sep 22 2018

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Oct 10 2017 : 2:01PM
Among the accusers:
Gwyneth Paltrow was intimidated by him, and her parents are Blythe Danner and director and producer Bruce Paltrow. You can imagine how much worse the power dynamic was for others.

Senior Member

Gone for a walk.
1636 Posts
5/08
Posted - Oct 11 2017 : 12:03AM
Had to edit because I just noticed that you already got the Seth McFarlane thing covered.
Edited by - Macko69 on 10/11/2017 12:06:24 AM
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
3/03
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 1:28PM
The sad fact is that he was a known monster and creep before this story broke. He was horribly abusive to men and women -- although in our society the sexual harassment of women has come to have a privileged place (whereas before, sadly, it had no place). And he was incredibly mean and dishonest in his business practices.
Many stars and directors loved him because he'd make movies that other people wouldn't and because he had excellent taste, a keen eye, and he was a fighter. They never had to deal with his dark side, although to pretend they didn't know about it is laughable. People who had to do business with him couldn't stand him.
That said, people in the business didn't know about the rapes. That wouldn't have been tolerated. But he was dead in the water after the New York Times article came out; the rape allegations in the New Yorker piece were just the coup de grace.

Senior Member

3151 Posts
1/09
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 3:36PM
I cannot understand why there is a meeting about this "man". Don't they trust the word of several Oscar winning and other top ranking actresses?.
He should be forced to hand any Oscars he won back, be jailed for any crimes and serve his time in full. A disgrace.
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13083 Posts
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Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 9:00PM
^
As of today, he's been kicked out the the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. But they can't take away his Oscars. They were awarded to the films, and other producers involved with those films received Oscars, too. Also, how can they force him to give up physical property? Those Oscars weren't stolen from anybody else. Plus Statuettes are the least of anybody's worries. He's been disgraced and ostracized once and for all.
 
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13083 Posts
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Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 9:08PM

He's known to be an entirely different person from his brother. Harvey ran the main label and worked out of New York City, whereas Bob runs the Dimension label and works out of Los Angeles. They had barely spoken in years. It's likely that Harvey's actions will bring the entire company down with him, including Bob and about 180 employees, which is really unfortunate.
 
Impresario of the Inane

"I'll never drink semen from a fucking cup. Sorry." - Brett Rossi
32109 Posts
8/03
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 9:28PM
Unrelated factoid: Oscar winners do not own their statuette. They remain the property of the Academy. I know this because someone tried to sell one some years ago.

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 9:59PM
They own them.
"Award winners must comply with these rules and regulations. Award winners shall not sell or otherwise dispose of the Oscar statuette, nor permit it to be sold or disposed of by operation of law, without first offering to sell it to the Academy for the sum of $1.00."
"Oscars are increasingly rare finds at auction. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences introduced an agreement in 1950 that banned winners from selling their Oscars to anyone but the Academy for the nominal sum of $1."
Oscars awarded before the agreement aren't subject to the agreement.

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 10:01PM
As if that would ever happen.

Senior Member

Real news. Fake president.
13914 Posts
3/03
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 11:22PM
Still a member: admitted, convicted rapist of a 13 year old girl and fugitive from American justice Roman Polanski.
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
3/03
Posted - Oct 14 2017 : 11:52PM
^
True, but one step at a time is better than no movement at all.
 
All-Star Member

I came to turn on everyone
1721 Posts
6/10
Posted - Oct 15 2017 : 11:15PM
For raping Rose McGowan and Asia Argento, Harvey Weinstein should be prosecuted, convicted and imprisoned. These two women are genuine victims of Weinstein, and they are probably not the only ones.
But it is important to distinguish between rape (where the sex is by definition non-consensual, but which might also legitimately include ‘consent’ obtained via physical intimidation) and general creepiness (the bathrobes, the massage ‘requests’, the semi-public masturbation)
Because in relation to Weinstein's creepy behaviour, all I’m seeing is a bunch of privileged white female millionaire ostriches taking their heads out of the sand and twitting ‘me too’.
It is all too convenient for the Winslets of this world to say she kept quiet because she feared for her career. There is a large degree of self-servingness about this - these women knew what Weinstein was like, may have known that for some women it was something far worse than creepiness, but continued their money-making celebrity lives nevertheless. The victims of Weinstein’s creepiness did nothing to shine a light on it because their careers were more important to them than doing the right thing.
Angelina Jolie and Courtney Love come out of this with credit. The rest, as in those that refused do the massage but still managed to have a career, give the impression of participating in a Sugar Daddy interview gone wrong.
I suppose this will be seen as victim-blaming but as far as I’m concerned not all ‘victims’ have suffered the same abuse. While I don’t deny that Winslet, Delevingne et al. had an unpleasant time in the presence of Harvey Weinstein, however in the world of victims of male power/abuse they don’t rank particularly high. I don’t expect them to give up their privilege, because they won’t, or wear hair-shirts, unless they’re Gucci, but their decades of silence speaks volumes. Weinstein’s enablers were not just underlings who were directly financially dependent upon him, but also the rich women who didn't speak out because they were 'afraid' they might have missed out on a role in blockbuster movie.
To repeat: for raping Rose McGowan and Asia Argento (and possibly others), Harvey Weinstein should be prosecuted, convicted and imprisoned. The fact that Weinstein is unlikely to spend a minute behind bars is more disturbing than him exposing his dick to a variety of starlets who, by most accounts, were creeped-out and left the room...
Edited by - Sexy Sadie on 10/15/2017 11:17:51 PM
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
3/03
Posted - Oct 15 2017 : 11:17PM
Even putting aside Allen's own sex-offender status, this incredibly tone-deaf quote from the article demonstrates why harassment of women continues in Hollywood:
.
Edited by - bob on 10/19/2017 3:50:15 AM
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
3/03
Posted - Oct 15 2017 : 11:36PM
^^
The "privileged white female millionaire ostriches" who spoke out were just aspiring actresses when the harassment episodes took place. They can speak out now precisely because they have the credibility, public platform, and "fuck you" power that they didn't have before and which success and wealth have given them.
Less privileged women have spoken anonymously, and many will never speak out, because of the same power dynamics that allowed the behavior to continue for so long. You would have to multiply the "speak-outers" by a substantial factor in order to arrive at actual the number of women that Weinstein did this to. For the rapes, a factor there too, I'm sure.
Would you have preferred if these "privileged white female millionaire ostriches" had never spoken out and his behavior had continued? Because it takes a lot of women's voices speaking in unison to topple a creep like this and, hopefully, to continue to change the system.
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All-Star Member

I came to turn on everyone
1721 Posts
6/10
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 5:59AM
^ As usual Bob, your reasonableness and the intelligence of your viewpoint are probative. I also acknowledge there is a certain lack of charity in my post to which you are responding.
I agree, in particular, that “it takes a lot of women's voices speaking in unison to topple a creep like this.” Your concluding wish - “and, hopefully, to continue to change the system" - is, however, more instructive regarding the conspiracy of silence that is inherent to ’the system’.
Other powerful people in Hollywood would have known exactly what was going on and did nothing. The talent (not just actors, but technical artistes and other creatives) do themselves no favours by leaving their integrity at the door (”Hey, integrity doesn’t pay the bills”, I hear you say).
The general slavishness of Hollywood at the altar of money is the essential reason this has come out now. The Weinstein Company no longer wields the industry power generally that it did previously.
Sure, there may be safety in numbers, but it’s definitely safer for “millionaire ostriches” (of all genders and ethnicities) to stand on their principles when there’s no downside on the back end.

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 11:32AM
My take on the "privileged white female millionaire ostriches" is a little different.
Somehow if the women aren't rich, they aren't held to be credible, and people immediately heap on scorn that they are just trying to get rich or famous by making their claims (although if they become numerous enough, the story becomes more plausible).* And if they are rich and have position, we can attack them for something else. When would we have that magical situation where we wouldn't be blaming and attacking the women?
*Of course, predators generally target the weak, so assaults on prostitutes, the poor, the very young, drug addicts, and people with intellectual disabilities (what we used to call 'mentally retarded') are very common. They serve the dual purpose of also having low credibility should they testify in court. Or there's also an ugly undercoating of 'they don't matter as much.'
It's pretty much a given that any woman assaulted is going to be attacked if she goes public, so let's just NOT.
 
All-Star Member

I came to turn on everyone
1721 Posts
6/10
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 3:35PM
^ Yes it's true my relative indifference to the tribulations of Ms Winslet and Ms Delevingne could be viewed as attacking them. And, 'fessing up here, my analysis may be in part motivated by my distaste for their work...
Nevertheless it's not the experience of darling Kate that's going to ...
...and from the linked article, this mealy-mouthed piece of history-revising bs by 'the Academy':
What are they saying here? Weinstein is the only one? That no-one knew anything until a week ago? Interesting that it's Scotland Yard doing the investigating - I imagine the LAPD are too busy hunting down DREAMERs...

Senior Member

Stay Beautiful
1126 Posts
10/17
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 4:16PM
Weinstein is just the tip of the iceberg. There are more big producers who are untouchable.
WhiteEagle
Deactivated User

26 Posts
10/17
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 4:55PM
Hollywood should be wiped out.
Maybe an atomic bomb would be useful...
Pimps, sluts, degeneration everywhere...
Maybe all Californication should be wiped out... O_o

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 4:58PM
Plenty of petty little business owners leverage their 'power' and are equally untouchable. Assholes running little diners in towns you never heard of.
Plenty of high school girls who have accused football players have had tires slashed, death threats, and been run out of town.

Senior Member

Stay Beautiful
1126 Posts
10/17
Posted - Oct 16 2017 : 5:04PM
Jimmy Savile proved what joke the British Establishment really is.
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
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Posted - Oct 17 2017 : 12:23AM
Who knew, and how much, and when, are empirical questions that are impossible to answer. What people could have done without the victims speaking up and The New York Times and The New Yorker building the cases is also questionable. Harvey was rich and had a phalanx of talented and highly paid lawyers and publicists who could (and did) manipulate the system and attack or silence his accusers.
Further, the issue of who is powerful in Hollywood, and in what ways, is also complicated. Top actors (not most actors) make a lot of money, but they are not powerful except in their ability to marshal an audience. For instance, Brad Pitt confronted Weinstein personally, but what else was he going to do? The heads of other studios, who exert a more useful kind of power in some ways, would have no reason to know what Harvey was up to and no way to get at him if they did. As the head of his own company, he had no one to answer to other than the court of public opinion and the courts of the law. The only people who could really have done something (and ultimately did) were the women whom he attacked, who were frightened of him. No one else had the necessary combination of the power to accuse and the ability to testify. That is the truly insidious thing about this kind of abusive behavior. The abuse itself breaks down the will of the victims to seek justice. It isolates them, marginalizes them, crushes them. To go back to the "ostriches" for a moment, you're not the only one who's calling them out on social media. How must that feel to them, to be attacked when they've finally scared up the courage to say something? So much for being powerful. Money and fame don't immunize you from shame, scorn, and vitriol.
What we need now isn't a retrospective assessment of what people could have done, or a parsing of blame for missed opportunities. There's a cultural inflection point to be taken advantage of, and I think we're all best served if we focus on making good use of it, praising anyone who speaks up, and having compassion for those who feel too powerless to do so.
People in power are always in the best position to effect change. Let's hope they'll lead.
.
.
[typos]
Edited by - bob on 10/17/2017 3:27:06 AM

Senior Member

2116 Posts
2/08
Posted - Oct 17 2017 : 6:48AM
I listened to an NPR segment yesterday about Shirley Temple auditioning at MGM when she was 11 years old. Allegedly Shirley was alone in an audition with an MGM senior producer when, at the conclusion he unzipped his trousers and took out his cock. She immediately ran from that room to the one where her mother was waiting with Lois Mayer. She was met with her mother hurriedly backing from the room with Mayer groping, pawing and perusing her. They both ran from the studio.
If this perversion, sexual assault and pedophilia has been going on that flagrantly for this long how can we still be astounded and "surprised with the antics of Weinstein, Polanski, Allen, Crosby, Ailes, Clinton, Trump and O'Reilly? I was going to say this shit has to stop but it is obvious it's not going to so instead WE need to put a stop to it! I don't care who you are in politics or Hollywood. There are no virgins here. It's a known or should-have-known situation. Anthony Weiner (a complete POS) goes to prison for "sexting" a juvenile and we still elect these criminals to office and toss ba-jillions of dollars at their movies and go ga-ga over the Academy Awards? Really, is there any wonder?
 
All-Star Member

I came to turn on everyone
1721 Posts
6/10
Posted - Oct 17 2017 : 1:59PM
^^ Very eloquent Bob. What I'm taking away from it, though, is that nobody is responsible* for anyone else in Hollywood and there's nothing that can be done about the behaviour of powerful men. I'm assuming you also think that Weinstein is an outlier.
[edit:* By responsible I don't mean that anybody else's business is my business, in the busybody sense, BUT I also don't mean that my behaviours and choices don't count in determining the type of society, or culture, in which I participate. Your account of the non-parsing of blame leaves very little space for shared mores and ethics - that is Hollywood is an entirely atomised society and its culture is merely the sum of its parts, to the nearest billion dollar or two. Blind eyes are the rule not the exception. That's what I mean by 'nobody is responsible'.]
Edited by - Sexy Sadie on 10/17/2017 8:51:28 PM
[typo]
Edited by - Sexy Sadie on 10/17/2017 8:54:30 PM
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13083 Posts
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Posted - Oct 18 2017 : 1:23AM
In today's Variety:
Industry leadership starts here.
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
3/03
Posted - Oct 18 2017 : 1:59AM
^^
I didn't say nothing could be done. I said that it's not useful to point fingers. The people who are responsible for what Harvey Weinstein did are Harvey Weinstein, the talents agents and the particular people in his company who pimped for him, and the lawyers and publicists who enabled him to elude pursuit.
Harvey Weinstein was an outlier in certain ways: the sheer number and extremity of his offenses; the systematic way he enacted his "seductions"; his freedom as the head of his own company; the misdirection of his political commitments; the extent of his social network, the pedigree of his movies and the unique opportunities they offered. These factors enabled a perfect storm. Fittingly, outing him has created a truly pyrotechnic flashpoint: A lot of people have woken up and a lot of positive anger has been unleashed. That's great news.
But Harvey isn't the only one by a longshot. More heads will roll in the coming weeks and months. There's an issue larger than Harvey or any other particular predator, one about the culture of the movie business -- the nexus of sex, money, power, and ambition -- which goes beyond any single scandal. There's an even larger issue concerning gender politics and power in all aspects of our economic and social life as a country. Creating a culture is something we all participate in, which we're all responsible for. There's no easy fix, but that doesn't mean we throw up our hands. Weeding out bad individuals is helpful, but there's a system that continues to create and nurture them that has to be addressed. It's a group effort.
The Variety piece I linked above reflects a good first step. You'll note how many high-ranking woman executives are quoted there. The funny thing about the movie business today is that, for all the problems raised by its unique mash-up of glamor/sex/money, the industry has a ton of powerful women, particularly at the big film and television studios. I think they're going to start flexing their muscles, and believe I that a lot of the powerful men in Hollywood are going to support and cheer them on.
The most difficult “workplaces” to oversee and regulate in Hollywood are movie sets and social engagements (which are, in fact, workplaces). Movie sets aren’t controlled by the studios. The studios hire people – outside producers, directors, actors, crew – to make each picture. Studio executives visit sets and trouble-shoot from time to time, but they can’t babysit literally hundreds of people and they aren’t omniscient. Each film production is a unique, organic entity. It’s always a changing cast of characters, and chaos reigns amid countless daily micro-transactions over the course of 2 or 3 months of filming. There are few better places to engage in bad behavior than on a movie set. Except for social engagements, which are as good . . . or worse.
How to crack that nut is a much tougher challenge.
.
.
[typos]
Edited by - bob on 10/18/2017 2:06:27 AM
 
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13083 Posts
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Posted - Oct 19 2017 : 3:47AM
Lindy West in The New York Times:
The Hollywood Reporter:

Senior Member

I don't trust men who don't like big tits.
2533 Posts
12/04
Posted - Oct 26 2017 : 3:02AM
selective Hollywood outrage/hypocrisy. Don't get me wrong Weinstein deserves Hollywood shitting on him and turning their back on him...but I guarantee some of these same Hollywood people are advocates for roman polanski. GTFOH!

Senior Member

2970 Posts
2/15
Posted - Oct 27 2017 : 4:41PM
^ To me, it's actually all the moral lecturing we recieve from so many Hollywood multi-millionaires. The only way they can now publicly justify working with such people is by (very hard to believe) whining: "I didn't know, I didn't know".
(Note: I draw a distinction between people doing what they have to to make a living, as oppossed to doing so to make millions and millions of dollars.)
 
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I came to turn on everyone
1721 Posts
6/10
Posted - Oct 28 2017 : 12:46AM
Nobody knew. He was the only one. He's cured now.
 
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13083 Posts
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Posted - Nov 2 2017 : 3:04AM
The Hollywood Reporter:
 
All-Star Member

13083 Posts
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Posted - Nov 2 2017 : 3:25AM
Actually, this statement is not representative of what's happening in the movie and television industries right now. If you read the trades, such as Variety and The Hollywood Reporter, not to mention The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times, there's a lot of positive activity going on. Predators are being outed on a daily basis, from James Toback to Kevin Spacey. An open dialogue about the issues has started.
Because, here's the thing: People knowing second or third hand about the bad behavior of others is not enough, because we aren't entitled to be vigilantes. Unfortunately, the victims must speak up. That's the way both court systems and corporate human resources departments work. Of course, we need to create a framework where speaking up is a meaningful option, but that's only part of the battle. Fighting evil requires individual bravery. Luckily some brave victims are telling their stories. And some people who looked the other way, like Quentin Tarantino, are also speaking up and admitting it. Better late than never.
Yes, this would all have been better if it had started sooner, but it's here now, so let's embrace it.

Senior Member

2970 Posts
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Posted - Nov 2 2017 : 6:57AM
^ "People knowing second or third hand about the bad behavior of others is not enough, because we aren't entitled to be vigilantes"
I don't think it was expecting anyone to be a vigilante. It was that if you've publicly stated yourself as a social justice warrior, then you would make a decision to not work with such people (for the purpose of making millions of dollars).
A positive that I'm hoping for from all this is that western society will no longer seek moral guidance from Hollywood actors; no matter what social justice film or claim they have just made.
Oh, and I think Sexy Sadie's comment was sarcasm.
A_Fan
Deactivated User

1212 Posts
9/16
Posted - Nov 2 2017 : 9:52AM
Even when I was a kid, i was smart enough to not look upon athletes and movie/TV people to be my moral guidance. I just enjoyed their performances in their chosen career. I really dislike parents who lift up celebrities to their children as beacons of light.

Senior Member

Stay Beautiful
1126 Posts
10/17
Posted - Nov 3 2017 : 8:14PM
^ Kevin Spacey is also in the Hollywood scandal, and he's one of my favourite actors. 😔

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Nov 3 2017 : 9:07PM
Yeah, sad to see that. I was hoping it was a one-off, but it's a pattern of behavior.

Senior Member

Gone for a walk.
1636 Posts
5/08
Posted - Nov 3 2017 : 10:43PM
The thing that just puzzles me about all of the high profile predators being exposed are the number of powerful men who are willing to have sex with unwilling partners. And for the men being exposed in these scandals, I would assume that their fame, power and financial means put them in that rare category of men who could easily find many willing partners. I know this is more about power over someone else than it is about sex, but it's at least in partly about sex. How can a man keep an erection when they know their partner is disgusted by him? I can't even begin to imagine how lousy sex would be with someone who would rather be somewhere far away. It sounds more depressing than pleasurable.
 
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Your other left
28339 Posts
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Posted - Nov 3 2017 : 11:18PM
You're thinking about sex as a shared experience of physical pleasure and intimacy. This kind of sex is about power. Many (most?) sexual abusers were themselves abused as children. It creates a vicious cycle. The abused become abusers because that's the only way they can feel like they've taken back the power, the control, that was wrenched from them by the predator(s) who attacked them.
Is it rational? Oh, hell no. Is it human? Unfortunately, yes.

Senior Member

2970 Posts
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Posted - Nov 4 2017 : 12:23AM
Surprise suprise, everyone knew. The company actually had written into his contract how such issues were to be dealt with.
He's not the only one. It's only because he can no longer get people multi-million dollar roles, that he's the only one being talked about.
As for being cured, by default he probably is. Women are no longer going to be lining up to be nice to him.

Senior Member

2970 Posts
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Posted - Nov 4 2017 : 12:32AM
Even when I was a kid, i was smart enough to not look upon athletes and movie/TV people to be my moral guidance. I just enjoyed their performances in their chosen career. I really dislike parents who lift up celebrities to their children as beacons of light.
Click to expand
In my country there's a weird phenomenon that when a high profile football player is exposed in a violence/sex/drugs scandal, parents are publically up in arms, demanding they be severely punished. Why? Because their kids look up to them as role models.
 
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Posted - Nov 4 2017 : 2:28AM
What fascinates me about this thread is how interested people are in "hypocrisy". There's a lot of hypocrisy in the world. Taken by itself -- specific acts not considered -- it's a sin of vanity and pretense. Big fucking deal. Unless the hypocrite in question has acted as badly as [Harvey Weinstein or fill in the blank], then s/he is not, in fact, as bad as [Harvey Weinstein or fill in the blank].
Shouldn't we try to rank kinds of bad conduct in their proper order?
For instance: Murder > Rape > Molestation > Assault > Sexual Harassment > Being a General Shithead > Hypocrisy. When you get to hypocrisy, you're several big steps down.
If Donald Trump's worst quality were mere hypocrisy, I'd be dancing in the streets.

Senior Member

2970 Posts
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Posted - Nov 4 2017 : 8:48AM
^ But it's more than hypocrisy; it's that these Hollywood multi-millionaires often present themselves as the moral arbiters of the world. (And western society holds up things they say and do as if they are grand acts of wisdom.)
Here's a relevant (conservative commentator) article
/>Edited by - Simple Simon on 11/4/2017 9:00:47 AM

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"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Nov 4 2017 : 8:08PM
[link inactive:404 - Page not found]Uma Thurman on Harassment in Hollywood:

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"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
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11/13
Posted - Nov 4 2017 : 8:35PM
I just heard Paz de la Huerta on tv.
Weinstein is going to be remembered as a monster.
 
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Posted - Nov 5 2017 : 11:33AM
Look up the definition of "hypocrisy". People who, as you put it, unjustifiably "present themselves as moral arbiters of the world" is precisely what the word "hypocrites" means.
Typical conservative response trying to deflect the issue from sexual predators and mis-directing it to a critique of "those Hollywood liberals".
What I see here, and in a lot of responses of this kind, is plain envy, which is up there with hypocrisy in my book.

Senior Member

2970 Posts
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Posted - Nov 5 2017 : 5:04PM
^
"Look up the definition of "hypocrisy". People who, as you put it, unjustifiably "present themselves as moral arbiters of the world" is precisely what the word "hypocrites" means."
Wow. I just looked up an old Oxford dictionary:
"Simulation of virtue or goodness; dissimulation, pretence."
I did not know that. I've spent my whole life thinking it meant saying something was wrong but doing it yourself. Apologies Bob. I stand corrected.
Re. the article, well it was the typical conservative response of: the left are all just... (people who say one thing yet do another). But I think in these cases, such criticisms are valid.
And the reason I describe these people by their financial status, is not because of envy; it's because it means they have choices that an average person really doesn't.
 
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Posted - Nov 5 2017 : 6:38PM
^
The threat of being sued for defamation by an even richer multi-millionaire, for everything you own, in a "he said, she said" situation isn't exactly the pinnacle of free choice.
Ashley Judd put herself at tremendous risk and, for that, I admire her tremendously.

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Posted - Nov 6 2017 : 2:37AM
^ Actually, I meant the multi-millionaires that swan around the world preaching social justice. If they believed someone to be an active sexual predator and assaulter, that they would exercise the choice that they have, to not work with such individuals.
When it comes to sexual assault, I don't actually believe public accusations are appropriate; as if they are incorrect, individuals identified will still always be tarnished.
 
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Posted - Nov 6 2017 : 11:18AM
^
I guess you and I will disagree.

Senior Member

"In Defense of Rape and Incest" by Steve King
6995 Posts
11/13
Posted - Nov 6 2017 : 11:20AM
I'm fine with public accusations.
We have libel laws and slander laws to protect the innocent.
Nobody does diddly when there are 'only a few' accusers. Nobody does diddly when the complaint is for behavior that is about poor judgment that is not too alarming (old guy patted my ass and cracked a joke).
When 50 or 70 accusers are out there, it's a thing. You'll notice that when people come out and make their complaints, they center around particular people. There are hundreds and thousands of Hollywood people that nobody is complaining about.
Court cases can drag victims through Hell. Public opinion is a good deterrent.
Free speech.
I highly encourage people to find out if their incident was a one-off, to see if they can band together with other victims, and to go public.
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