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Lord of Lust

az-mo-day-us
14079 Posts
10/01
Posted - Sep 25 2013 : 4:36AM

Lord of Lust

az-mo-day-us
14079 Posts
10/01
Posted - Sep 26 2013 : 5:02AM
 
All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
13912 Posts
1/08
Posted - Sep 27 2013 : 12:52AM

I sense a trend is developing here...
 
All-Star Member

Woman of the Decade
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Posted - Sep 27 2013 : 12:58AM
Battle Royal.jpg
All Out War!!

All Out War.JPG
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Woman of the Decade
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Posted - Sep 27 2013 : 3:14AM


The cracks are getting deeper and deeper between Congressional Republicans in both chambers. In the Senate, a simple request turned into a Republican-on-Republican floor fight Thursday when Sen. Harry Reid attempted to get unanimous consent from the Senate to move up the voting on the continuing resolution and its amendments so that the House could get the bill back Thursday night or early Friday. This move would give the House enough time to respond to hopefully get an agreement that would not let the government shut down.
Sen. Ted Cruz's (R-TX) puppy dog, Mike Lee (R-UT), objected, insisting that the votes have to happen Friday. That in turn brought out a clearly frustrated Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) who accused Lee and his buddy Cruz of delaying the vote and jamming the House purely for the purpose of grandstanding.
****
Meanwhile, it's still not GOP paradise on the House side of Capitol Hill. House Speaker John Boehner threw every wingnut dream into his debt ceiling hostage bill, but even with all that, he can't get the votes he needs for it. He's had to postpone the vote. It's deja vu all over again.
 
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Posted - Sep 27 2013 : 3:22AM
Tom Toles:
GOP back up.gif
 
Big Double Everything Fan

Poor Turkey running for her life with Christmas Hat
9726 Posts
9/01
Posted - Sep 27 2013 : 7:19PM
^ Yup, cut off the nose to spite the face
 
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Posted - Oct 2 2013 : 12:26AM

You know we've reached Defcon-4 when Peter King, is calling another faction of Republicans as "crazies"
 
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Woman of the Decade
13912 Posts
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Posted - Oct 10 2013 : 2:41AM
Paul Ryan.png
Some conservatives were howling over Ryan's op-ed in the Wall Street Journal on Wednesday where the 2012 GOP vice presidential nominee and current chair of the House Budget Committee suggested his plan to solve the current stalemate in Washington over the government shutdown and debt ceiling.
Ryan suggested significant entitlement reform and specifically pointed to areas where he thinks Democrats and Republicans can find consensus. But, despite talking about ways to cut government spending and implement tax reform, the Wisconsin congressman angered tea partiers by not mentioning the word "Obamacare" once.
The result was immediate outrage. Erick Erickson saw this as Republican leaders selling out the base yet again, another blogger on Erickson's site, Red State, called the op-ed "a confirmation of our worst fears . . This is the road to cave city." The Senate Conservatives Fund, the Ted Cruz-backed right wing PAC, tweeted in rage at Paul Ryan "Obamacare is the #1 job killer and it will bankrupt our country. Your plan does nothing to stop it." Ryan’s op-ed also met disapproval from Michael Needham, the CEO of Heritage Action who said at a breakfast on Wednesday morning "This is a fight about Obamacare. The attention of Republicans and conservatives needs to be back on Obamacare and not on other ways out of this situation."

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 10 2013 : 6:11AM
[url=295892]John Podhoretz: You’re ruining it, not repairing it.
Your response,
Oh, you wish...

Senior Member

12345
12200 Posts
9/02
Posted - Oct 10 2013 : 12:12PM
How conservative is it to create a pointless shutdown that costs $200,000,000 a day, and to pointlessly risk a default that would raise the interest rates on the debt?
The biggest drivers of the debt are Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, and some wars in the middle east that were supposed to pay for themselves while we got lauded as liberators. But I guess now they have some new ways to put us deeper in debt without creating anything of value.
 
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Woman of the Decade
13912 Posts
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Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:07AM
Unbelievable: You guys have managed to piss off Podhoretz...
[ invalid url ]


who literally came down on Ted Cruz with all the force his name implies, and had Laura Ingraham co-signing

"How exactly was he going to achieve abolition of Obamacare? Explain that to me. Has he ever explained it? And where is he now?" Krauthammer said on “The Laura Ingraham Show.”

Krauthammer, who has previously hit Cruz (R-Texas) on the strategy of shutdown to defund Obamacare, included Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) in his questioning and said the two went home to "have lunch."

"I mean his sidekick, Sen. [Mike] Lee said, 'Oh, we're past Obamacare. We moved on.' These are the generals who lead people into the Battle of [the] Little Bighorn and then go home and have lunch and leave the troops out there? Where are they? Where are the generals? What's their strategy to get abolition of Obamacare?" Krauthammer said.
Krauthammer did emphasize while he is on the ideological side of repealing Obamacare, there was no strategy laid out by Cruz.
"I argued [to repeal Obamacare] in '09 and '10. I argued it every week in my writing, on television … all of us were in the trenches. Cruz arrives on the scene and pretends he's just begun the fight against Obamacare," Krauthammer said.
He continued, "I've been calling this the ‘kamikaze brigade'...'the suicide caucus.' I'm all for charging the barricades, but you’ve got to show me how to penetrate them. … And people are saying Republicans are in retreat. They’re not in retreat, there never was a way to abolish Obamacare now," Krauthammer said.
Ingraham also expressed her frustration.
"I'm with Cruz in spirit, I like the fact that he’s fighting, but I think we could’ve achieved real victory on the delay and the 'no Washington’ exemption,' she said.
 
Big Double Everything Fan

Poor Turkey running for her life with Christmas Hat
9726 Posts
9/01
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 10:54AM
The polls are not doing well for the elephant in the room. Good. People are finally seeing through the fake elephant.
 
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Woman of the Decade
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1/08
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 11:47AM
Didn't the Republican accuse Dems of overreaching when they were in the House? Well, Republicans overreached Big Time this week.
And you know who's most at fault in all this?
This Guy:
reagan.jpg
Him and this map:
1984.jpg
49 States, that's what Ronald Reagan won in 1984. Nixon did 49 states too, but since his is the name that must never be mentioned, it's Reagan's that the right fetishes. That 49-state victory is a memory held as dearly by Republicans as the so-called "Camelot" Era is held by Democrats of a certain age. The problem for Republicans though is that they've never been able to get past it. They've never been able to move on. They think they're Coke, which has, except for that one hiccup in the 80s, pretty much remained the same for 125 years. But a political party is not a soft drink. It's made up of real live, breathing, thinking, feeling, human beings.
It's one thing to honor the past and to use what worked in the past, but you don't stick strictly to the playbook. You build on the playbook. You evolve the playbook. The problem is, evolution is a four-letter word among conservatives.
What's worse, is that conservatives aren't even really hewing to Reagan's ideals. They act upon what they interpret Reagan's ideals to be. And they're wrong. As tired as Chris Matthew's endless schtick of revisiting the days of Reagan and House Speaker Tip O'Neil can get,
Reagan raised taxes. Reagan raised the debt limit. Reagan ran up deficits. Reagan worked with the Democratic Congress.
And then came Bill. And Hilary. And Newt. And the Republicans haven't been the same since.
They still believe they still have that aura of invincibility carried over both from Reagan, and from the years 2000-2006 when they ruled all three branches of government. They still cling to the belief that another 49-state sweep is just around the corner.
Nevermind that the once-reliable California has been lost to them since 1992, due to their intransigence on immigration. Never mind that New Hampshire and New Jersey also have gone permanently blue. Never mind about huge shift in Demographics over the past 25 years. Nope, the problems are just cosmetic and bad marketing.
See? The problem isn't the message! It's the volume!
When Megyn Kelly called Ohio for Obama, Rove denied it. He DENIED an actual fact. Why? Because it couldn't be true. It could not be true. We are Republicans. We are invincible. This cannot be happening. The Presidency belongs to US.
Republicans are fond of using "The American People" as the catchall phrase when electoral decisions are made that go their way. (That's what happened in Florida in 2000 for certain. Jeb Bush? Katherine Harris? What? No. It was The American People who chose George W. Bush to be president.) So, what about when things don't go their way? It's always some external force at fault: The Media. The Unions. George Soros. Obama played Santa Claus.
The myth of invincibility is hard to for the GOP to shake, and makes voters ripe for exploitation. Every year it seems, a brand new player on the scene comes by, promising to "honor the ideals of Ronald Reagan". So desperate are conservatives to relive those glory days, that they become easy prey for Every Tom, Dick and Harriet who claims to be Reagan's chosen successor. One by one they came, and one by one they were exposed as outright charlatans. Newt Gingrich. Sarah Palin. Christine O'Donnell. Michele Bachmann. Paul Ryan. Marco Rubio. (where has HE been in all this?). Scott Brown. Rand Paul. Mitt Romney. and now Ted Cruz.
Inversely, the party has shed or ignores those who are not "Reagan Strong". Arlen Specter. Dick Lugar. Olympia Snowe. Christie Whitman. J.C. Watts. Lisa Murkowski.
There is something to be said for confidence. In the months before a fight Floyd Mayweather tells you emphatically he's going to win. And he walks into every boxing ring believing he's already won the fight. Thus far, he's been right.
But confidence doesn't always work. There could well be someone on the Jacksonville Jaguars that is confident they can beat Denver on Sunday. There's confidence and there's abject denial of reality.
And that's how Ronald Reagan wrecked his party.
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Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 12:55PM
But ours go to eleven...

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 12:59PM

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 1:15PM
^ That sure seems as if she was talking directly to you Cody.
 
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Woman of the Decade
13912 Posts
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Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 1:21PM
Republicanism is still sexy under the right circumstances -- for example: 9/11.
But its an Anna-Kournikova kind of sexy. Substance is lacking, as are long-term strategies for improving one's game.
I don't think Republicans will lose the House in 2014. Hell, there's a pretty good chance they'll win the Senate in 2014.
But 2016, 2020, Repubs could suffer ass-whoopings of enormous proportions.

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 1:27PM
It's not. My version of in-your-face conservatism is well-rooted in the firm belief that it is not politically intelligent or a wise expenditure of resources. I've called for a truce with Tea Party insurgents. I've declared the idea of transposing Reaganism onto a 21st century with 21st century problems is untenable. I've fully joined with Rubin in the pursuit of a smarter conservative fight, on better grounds, with more emphasis on the intangibles the American people demand. There's no doubt I drink the conservative kool aid (60 proof) but I knew better than to indulge in too much of the Tea Party kool aid (99 proof) and now it's been turned up to 150 proof.
This is a party that refuses to learn any lessons, ANY, from victories or defeats.
But the idea that Reaganism, as it really was - pragmatic, practical, but forceful championing of conservative ideology - is out of date still strikes me as incorrect. What to make of the election and impending reelection of strong-willed Republican governors like Chris Christie, Scott Walker, Rick Snyder, John Kasich, and Susana Martinez?
Reagan wasn't nearly as pure or impractical as today's conservatives suggest or wish. There's hope that if Republicans understand the real appeal of Reagan, Kemp, G.W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Christie, Walker, Rubio, or Martinez that a broad winning coalition could be rebuilt. It will never be the fortress of 1984, but all we need is 50.1% after all.

Senior Member

12345
12200 Posts
9/02
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 2:12PM
Eh?
Purity? Gotta be kidding me.
Dangerous clowns.

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12345
12200 Posts
9/02
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 2:15PM
But that's not true, it's back to the ideological unreality, which does not work in practice.
Aka clowns.

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 2:24PM
^^^ You can't make these kinds of comments while simultaneously taking on the "loyal, obstructionist, opposition" position and cheering on the idiots. People will not take you seriously when you then speak with some level of sensible moderation.
A trip down memory lane, when you first shared with us your thoughts on Mr. Ted Cruz...
Clearly you were unable to see that it was the Republican Party who should have been scared of Mr. Cruz.
Then you make a post like this...
How can you expect people here at ADT to take you seriously. Calling him out and then cheering him on.
As for Mr. Cruz, I had this to say...
So thank you Mr. Rafael "Ted" Cruz for kicking the Republican Party when they were already down. And thank you Cody for helping to feed his already overblown ego.
Edited by - rlankford on 10/11/2013 2:25:38 PM

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 2:36PM
It's easy.
On the one hand, Ted Cruz fights the good fight, and of course I will cheer him on, especially as I'm pretty well resigned to the idea that conservatism will never be a majority opinion in the White House and I have no problem whatsoever in obstructing progressivism.
On the other hand, sensible moderation probably will be a majority opinion to the White House.
So say one thing, do another. That is just politics.

Senior Member

2709 Posts
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Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 2:41PM
^ But you are not a politician.
And most of us here will continue to chuckle at your posts.
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Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:05PM
Then let me try to spell it out.
I am a conservative. My goal is to advance fiscal/economic conservativism in all capacities everywhere. For ADT I guess it's more like explain why conservatives do what we do, believe what we believe, etc.
The best way to do that is to win elections and enact policy. To do that, conservative ideologues need to be energized (so we have to let our freak flag fly, so to speak, there's still room for Ted Cruz here) and tempered enough to support the sensible Republicans' elections/reelections.
We have to indulge the populist impulses of the voters, especially our primary voters i.e. the base. Denouncing Ted Cruz is like denouncing our own beliefs, and our base. It's not going to happen. It shouldn't happen. In fact, what's happening is a clear reflection of the base getting its way. They've got their fight, no matter how bad they lose in this fanciful hissy-fit, they wanted to throw a fit. A political party, and sensible members of the movement, don't have to over-indulge in our worst impulses though. It's easy to just do what we like, to hell with the rest.
But you don't win any arguments or elections by sticking to what sounds right to you and absolutely no one else. That much is obvious.
I don't want to live in a bubble, and I don't want you to either.
So I'll let you in on some of the darker impulses of the conservative conscience but that is what it is, a conscience. It's simply a reflection of our experiences, knowledge, and observations about the world. You don't have to always listen to your conscience, and we don't. Sometimes we reach a different conclusion than other conservatives - I call it "practical conservatism". And no two people reach the same conclusion on every single issue.
And then there are the true charlatans who believe absolutely none of it and con the rest of the true believers. Fox News is probably the biggest guilty party there, but it's not like O'Reilly and Hannity aren't independent conservatives.
And the whole thread circles around the conservatives war against one another, one side pushing for practical conservatism not to indulge our own demons and the other insisting that such "extremism...is no vice."
And frankly, I think both "sides" have this problem. Try as they might, the American people really aren't all-in on the progressive agenda. Climate change, no pursuit of entitlement reform, universal health care. The Democrats indulged their deeper conscience in 2008-10 and we smacked them out of office for the overreach.
Maybe Republicans/conservatives are doing the same.
 
Poetic Moderator

Long and Cursive road to the Ivory Pagoda in the province of Loraine
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Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:16PM
You were going to Texas to work for Rick Perry yes?

Senior Member

7415 Posts
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Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:18PM
Yes.

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:20PM
But clearly that is not the strategy of the current Republican Party.

Senior Member

12345
12200 Posts
9/02
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:30PM
^^^^
Unprincipled, comfortable with collateral damage.
We knew who you (collectively) were, but thanks for spelling it out.

Edited by - lindi on 10/11/2013 3:32:27 PM


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2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 3:55PM
Missed this first time through...
Voter turnout from Presidential year to Mid-Term year;
2000 / 2002 - 105 mil / 73 mil
2004 / 2006 - 122 mil / 81 mil
2008 / 2010 - 131 mil / 82 mil
The turnout in 2010 was older and whiter than ever, motivated in large part by the hate for the man with the dark skin living in the White House and complacency by those on the left after a victorious 2008. Hopefully a lesson was learned.
2012 / 2014 - 129 mil / ???

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 6:11PM
^Motivated by hatred of PelosiCare, Cap and Tax, $700 billion dollars of non-stimulus, and trillions in debt. The Democrats overreached, the conservatives woke up, the moderates were complacent (liberals turned out), and the middle income earners that turned out smacked the Democrats out of the House majority. We'll see if they learned their lesson, but the outlook still doesn't look good as the competitive races are in red states.

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 8:25PM
National Exit Polls as per CNN
by party ID... D's / R's / I's
2008 - 39/32/29
2010 - 35/35/29
I can break down age, race, gender and others, but I know facts don't matter to you so I won't bother. I also have a vague recollection from last year of your inability to read polls.

Senior Member

12345
12200 Posts
9/02
Posted - Oct 11 2013 : 8:53PM
"Polls don't matter."
Except when they do, of course.

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 6:45AM
^^You don't compare midterms to presidential elections. Turnout's too low for midterms. You compare a midterm to a midterm.
2006 vs. 2010
2006: Democrat (38%)/Republican (36%)/Independent (26%)
2010: Democrat (35%)/Republican (35%)/Independent (29%)
So we have an increase in Independents and a decrease among Democrats responsible for their losses.
But I said "liberal" on purpose. I didn't mean "Democrats" turned out at their regular numbers, but self-described liberals did.
2006: Liberal (20%)/Moderate (47%)/Conservative (32%)
2010: Liberal (20%)/Moderate (38%)/Conservative (42%)
Increased number of conservatives, drastically low number of moderates, and stagnant number of liberals. Liberals turned out as expected.
The exit polls in 2010 suggest the highest contributors were conservative turnout and moderate depression, resulting in an electorate significantly dismayed about the state of the economy (90% said it was "poor"), of only which 54% voted for the Republicans.
A big lesson of 2012 is that midterms are a terrible indicator for presidential elections. If the Democrats want to figure out how to avoid the mistakes of 2010 in 2014, they shouldn't look to 2012 or 2008, but 2006.
And Republicans should only look at 2010. It was an example of a party in power overreaching, failing, and falling.

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 11:19AM
^ Wrong
The D's have won the popular vote in 5 out of the last 6 Presidential Election years.
Bottom line, when there is high voter turnout the D's win. When the turnout is low, the R's win.
Which is why red states have tried so hard to make it difficult for the poor, minorities, and new voters from voting.
You can analyze it, re-analyze it and over analyze it. But its not really all that complicated Cody.

Senior Member

7415 Posts
8/10
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 12:26PM
^But it's not that simple. Midterms are inherently different from presidential elections. You don't take cues from presidential elections to elect specific Congressmen and Senators, and vice versa.
...and talk about refusing to learn any lessons...

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 12:31PM
Your assumption gives voters way too much credit. They are not that discerning.
 
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Woman of the Decade
13912 Posts
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Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 12:47PM
^
Actually I have to give Cody that one...there ARE states where Democrats are often elected for congress and yet go Republican when voting for an executive office such as governor and/or president and vice versa.
West Virginia has a Democratic governor and two Dem Senators. Barack Obama won a mere 35% of the vote there.
Montana same thing, Democratic governor and two Dem Seantors. Obama did a little better there, but the state hasn't voted Dem in a presidential election since '92.
Kentucky is one of the reddest states going, and yet, since 1947, only two Republicans have ever been elected governor.
Flipside, New York and Massachusetts, which both often elect Republican governors, but are otherwise blue.
So there are definitely states that are "bi-polar" in nature.

Edited by - sMILER gROGAN on 10/12/2013 12:48:53 PM


Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 2:28PM
Smiler, keep going with your examples. They will peter out quickly.
How many of the 226 Rupublican House district winners in 2012 voted for Obama? Just 17.
How many of the 209 Democratic House district winners in 2012 voted for Romney? Just 9.
So a grand total ot 26 of the 435 seats, or 6%, or 1 in 17 seats, cross-voted.
There are currently 15 states that have 2 Republican Senators. All 15 voted for Romney, and 14 of them have Republican Gov's. Kentucky, as you noted, is the exception.
There are currently 16 states that have 2 Democratic Senators. 15 of these 16 voted for Obama, with W. Virginia, as you noted, being the exception. 13 of these 16 have a D as Govenor. Michigan, New Mexico and Virginia are the exceptions, with Virginia about to flip back and, I'm betting, Michigan will in 2016.
*** Over the last 38 years, and will be 42 years at the end of the current term, New York has only had an R as Gov for 12 of those. It was one man, for 12 consecutive years - George Pataki. Not the strongest example.
Edited by - rlankford on 10/12/2013 2:52:21 PM

Senior Member

2709 Posts
6/06
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 3:00PM
Here is a great resource...
[link inactive:404 - Page not found]Introducing the 2014 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index
and I will highlight this...
 
All-Star Member

4629 Posts
8/11
Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 11:25PM
Simple explanation here in MA for that inconsistency. State has to balance the budget. Blue as we are, nobody likes taxes and that's how Dem around here have historically solved budget issues. Hence, a # of Republican governors elected since the 70's. With Reps and Senators, we,like everyone else, are looking for them to bring home the goodies and Democrats work just fine. The late Edward Kennedy was a wizard with federal money coming home. As for social issues, all electable politicians fall somewhere between moderate and ultra-liberal.
Edited by - aclayfan on 10/12/2013 11:27:47 PM
 
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Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 11:48PM
^ I did not say there were a lot of bi-polar states, but I just wanted to provide examples of some places where they do have discerning voters. It is becoming less and less common.
 
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Posted - Oct 12 2013 : 11:56PM
Louie Gohmert strikes again!

And yes, he is referring to that John McCain.
facepalm1.jpg
 
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Woman of the Decade
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Posted - Oct 17 2013 : 1:09AM
Believe it or not, everything up to this point may have just been the Prologue in the Great Self-Immolation War.
 
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Woman of the Decade
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Posted - Oct 17 2013 : 1:12AM

Columbus didn’t sail the Ocean Blue to discover a land where we wait around for Mitch McConnell and Harry Reid to decide the future of our lives.
We decide. Not the power brokers in DC. We haven’t gone all this time and risked so much over two hundred years to turn the keys over now to others to run our lives.
The Veterans on the Mall today don’t deserve a country the leaders of which play games with a memorial dedicated to them and their fallen brethren.
Mitch McConnell is the single obstacle we have this week to taking our country back from the death spiral instigated by Obama and his merry band of community organizers.
Let Mitch McConnell know that if he cuts a deal that doesn’t defund or delay Obamacare, he will not be coming back to the Senate.
[/quote]
 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Oct 17 2013 : 2:04AM
^ Somebody might want to inform Mr. Ericson, who obviously slept through history class, that Columbus didn't sail the ocean blue in order to found the United States.
I guess he doesn't know about the Whiskey Rebellion, either.
 
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Woman of the Decade
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Posted - Oct 18 2013 : 2:51AM


Glenn Beck, who already didn’t like Mitch McConnell, found it beyond laughable how the Senate Minority Leader was able to place a two-billion-dollar earmark for a Kentucky dam in the bill to reopen the government. Beck brought Ann Coulter on his show for the second time this week and asked her point-blank, "You still in love with Mitch McConnell?"
Coulter dismissed this "conspiracy theory," and Beck, along with his co-hosts, groaned as Coulter attempted to defend McConnell by saying that 1) he didn’t write the bill, and 2) "if this dam bursts, you have basically another Katrina." As Beck continued to laugh at how clean McConnell’s hands supposedly are here, Coulter teased, "You are such brats!"
They ended up switching topics when Coulter said, "I think we should reflect on whether it was a good idea or a bad idea for you conspiracy theorists to be pushing Christine O’Donnell in Delaware, Richard Mourdock in Indiana." She argued that Ted Cruz and Mike Lee would have had more allies if conservatives hadn't tried to primary so many Republicans in 2010 and 2012.

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12345
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9/02
Posted - Oct 18 2013 : 11:15AM
I just wish they would fund more infrastructure -- dams, bridges, roads, whatever. Not just the favored few (one).
 
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Woman of the Decade
13912 Posts
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Posted - Oct 19 2013 : 1:49AM
Sarah Palin declares WAR!!


Tonight’s press coverage of the status quo antics in Washington, D.C. energizes us further. Tonight's New Jersey race was a win for Barack Obama, and the Senate deal in D.C. was a loss for the American people replete with more back-room deals, billion dollar corrupt earmark kickbacks, and weak leadership unwilling to stand up for the people who sent them to Washington. What happened in D.C. tonight reminds us of how hard we must fight in 2014 to return to a government of the people, by the people, for the people. These politicians work for us, and yet a new poll accurately reflects that just 13% of us feel as though this country that we love is on the right track.
The way forward is to elect leaders who will listen to us; and if they don’t, we must hold them accountable on election day – no matter what party. Let's commit to continue to be in the trenches fighting for those who stand on principle over politics, despite the odds.
Friends, do not be discouraged by the shenanigans of D.C.'s permanent political class today. Be energized. We're going to shake things up in 2014. Rest well tonight, for soon we must focus on important House and Senate races. Let’s start with Kentucky -- which happens to be awfully close to South Carolina, Tennessee, and Mississippi -- from sea to shining sea we will not give up. We’ve only just begun to fight.

As many a political pundit has already noted, senators in those three states she just mentioned are all up for re-election: They are Lindsey Graham (SC), Lamar Alexander (TN) and Thad Cochran (MS).
In the eyes of Democrats, (and really, anybody with common sense), these three have been -- like Bob Bennett in Utah -- three of the most conservative senators of modern times. That, of course, is hardly good enough for the Tea Party. So all three may be facing primary challenges along with Mitch McConnell.
Of course Dems are watching carefully: If McConnell or Graham fall in a primary, we could conceivably, maybe, perhaps, take KY or SC. They are going to try to recruit solid candidates to run, and if either of those two falls, money will pour into Dem candidates. I don't see any hope for TN or MS though; those guys are not likely to lose primary challenges and even if they do, the chances for a Dem takeover are low.
Still. Popcorn!

 
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Woman of the Decade
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Posted - Oct 23 2013 : 1:20AM

Liz Cheney tried to raise money Tuesday by calling John McCain a "liberal Republican" who's backing her opponent in the Wyoming Republican Senate primary, Republican Sen. Mike Enzi.
"Liberal Republican Senators like John McCain and Olympia Snowe have endorsed my opponent," the daughter of the former vice president wrote, before asking for cash. "We must be doing something right if these folks are fighting so hard to preserve the status quo."

Note: Snowe served alongside Enzi for about 16 years, McCain has served alongside him for a little longer than that.
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