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AuthorPost

Member


UK
296 Posts
4/04
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 3:17PM
I have decided this year to do more reading.

At the moment I'm reading...

James Patterson's Mary Mary

and mostly:

Peter Biskind's Easy Riders, Raging Bulls

Both worth a look, if u are interested in the darker side of Hollywood.

'Click on Avatar to visit my website'

 
Questionable Moderator

Tastes so good...
12337 Posts
11/99
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 3:27PM
Due to the length of the first last book you read thread, I'm closing that one down and letting it be continued here.

"Vegetarianism for me is about saying ‘yes’ to things - even meat." - Coupling


Senior Member

Thread Killer
5479 Posts
10/05
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 4:32PM
I'm reading by Jade Lee. This is a superior erotic romance from an exceptional writer. Jade pushes a lot of boundaries of both erotica and romance in this one. Her romantic leads are both Chinese (unheard of in popular publishing), and they've already been married to one another for 25 years (also unheard of). Plus the writing is sublime, the erotic tension excruciating, the sex scenes original, and the plot unique. This is exactly what I strive for as a writer, and what I crave as a reader.
 
All-Star Member

mrbluelouboyle and Riley Steele
2998 Posts
12/03
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 4:41PM
I'm reading "Long Way Round" by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman.
The story of their motorcycle trip around the world.

Senior Member

1008 Posts
1/04
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 5:03PM
Both "Illium" and "Olympus" by Dan Simmons were great, I am also reading Vol 1 of the original Robert E. Howard "Conan" short stories, which are lot of fun...
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Member

845 Posts
4/05
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 5:16PM
Currently I'm flipping my way through David B. Coe's most recent one [link inactive:404 - Page not found]Shapers of Darkness. After I finish it I'll be on to George R. R. Martin's [link inactive:404 - Page not found]A Feast for Crows.

Senior Member

Thread Killer
5479 Posts
10/05
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 5:31PM
Aarrgghh! That book drove me crazy when I worked at Amazon. One of my jobs was to inform customers of delayed release dates, but that happens so often that I couldn't be proactive about it. Our policy was to await publisher contact before passing information on to customers. Had I had to initiate contact with publishers, that's all I'd do all day. Well "A Feast For Crows" just kept getting delayed and delayed, but the release date not officially pushed back, and all kinds of shit. Meantime, we had thousands of pre-orders languishing, and I was the one the customer service reps sought for help. Fucking book. I remember one of my mass-emailings went to several thousand customers. I haven't worked at Amazon for over a year, and I just saw this book on the new release shelf in Barnes and Noble. I said under my breath, "It's just now released? What the fuck?" It better be a damn good book.
 
All-Star Member

SAMCRO
17126 Posts
8/00
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 6:24PM
I just read Night Fall by Nelson DeMille which was a very good read about the TWA Flight 800 tragedy and it tied in 9-11 at the end. I am currently reading another DeMille book called Lion's Game and this sucker is over 900 pages which is totally my cup of tea, love long books and this guy impressed me the first time and so far this one's good too.

Devinn Lane

1407 Posts
1/04
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 10:05PM
I'm actually reading The Alchemist again. Great short read for the adventurous spirit.

xoxo
Devinn


Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 10:36PM
Size Matters: How Big Government Puts the Squeeze on America's Families, Finances, and Freedom by Joel Miller

I highly recommend this book. It is not anti-Democrat nor anti-Republican. It is anti-bureacracy, but not in a very bitter way. It does a good job of addressing the unintended consequences of policies and the poor incentive structure. This book is a good addition to other books that study the economics of government.

astro, I sent you an email about a week ago regarding this book. I think you would love it. I'd like for many people to read the book.

-1 for the Tennessee Valley Authority...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!

 
Poetic Moderator

Long and Cursive road to the Ivory Pagoda in the province of Loraine
12553 Posts
12/03
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 10:45PM
The Complete Stories - Franz Kafka, foreward by John Updike.

Edited by - redish on 1/16/2006 10:45:52 PM


Member

In the sad town, cold iron hands clap the party of clowns outside .
580 Posts
4/04
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 11:07PM
Naked Ambition - Carly Milne

Skinny Legs and All - Tom Robbins

 
Questionable Moderator

Tastes so good...
12337 Posts
11/99
Posted - Jan 16 2006 : 11:10PM
Endo, yeah, got your e-mail and sorry I haven't had a chance to get back to you. That one definitely interests me! Currently, however, I'm trying to get caught up on some of my comic reading. I'm continuing through the Superman trades, and read the two Chuck Austen collections, Unconditional Warfare and That Healing Touch . Unconditional Warfare does a nice job beginning the run with some new characters, a new bad guy, and plenty of questions. It also brings in war in the middle east (Qmec I think the country's called). Although the politics of the collection turned me off a little, it's nicely turned around in Healing Touch . Healing Touch advances the bad guy story while bringing in some other very nice touches and working the war angle in a very different way that actually interested me. Reading the first collection I wasn't sure how much of Austen's run I'd be checking out, but the second one has me curious enough that I'm definitely going to be checking more out.

"Vegetarianism for me is about saying ‘yes’ to things - even meat." - Coupling


Member

845 Posts
4/05
Posted - Jan 17 2006 : 8:14PM
It's should be a great book if the previous three in the series are any indication. I must say however that I went crazy waiting for this book to come out. It took so long that I started to wonder if George R. R. Martin had passed on and the series would be left unfinished.

Does anybody else have a fear that they'll be in the middle of reading a series and the author will die and leaving the series incomplete? Kind of selfish I know but true.


Member

New York
25 Posts
12/04
Posted - Jan 17 2006 : 9:00PM
James Ellroy's The Black Dahlia

I already read The Big Nowhere, which I realize comes after Black Dahlia, but from what I can tell, they're not directly connected, just set in the same universe.

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Official BlowBang Judge

Would you like my autograph?
7504 Posts
12/04
Posted - Jan 17 2006 : 9:12PM
Spartina by John Casey

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Scopophiliac
21098 Posts
9/02
Posted - Jan 17 2006 : 10:40PM
Farewell to an Idea , TJ Clark

Member

671 Posts
1/03
Posted - Jan 18 2006 : 9:12PM
I figure I will wait for the series to be over before I pick it up again. I read the first two books must be 5 or 6 years ago and would have to read them again.

Currently reading The Gormengast Novels by Mervyn Peake.

Lost Horizon
Deactivated User

1468 Posts
6/05
Posted - Jan 18 2006 : 9:30PM
Independent People - Halldor Laxness
Incredibly good. A masterpiece by one of the greatest European novelists of the twentieth century - he is easily of the same rank as Proust, Mann, Musil, etc in my opinion. Not sure I would recommend this novel to someone who had not read any Laxness before though. Anyone looking for an introduction to his work would probably be better off starting with one of his shorter works such as the superb The Fish Can Sing

Loose Cannon

488 Posts
8/05
Posted - Jan 19 2006 : 7:34AM
. I suck at physics, but this is a pretty good read.

Dong Xiaoping

1334 Posts
1/05
Posted - Jan 19 2006 : 5:31PM
'funeral rites' by jean genet- a truly demented ride inside the beautifully sordid mind of the evil saint.

'hunger' by knut hamsun- i can't believe how much i enjoyed this after five readings. probably my second favorite hamsun behind 'mysteries.' this newer translation by lyngstad also deserves major props for sticking with hamsun's odd mixing of tenses and quirky, jumpy prose.

 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Jan 19 2006 : 6:34PM
By Order of The President - W.E.B. Griffin. It was a pretty good page-turner but got a little stupid at the end. Not to the point of unbelievability, it was just of the 'Boy, that was dumb' variety. I'm sure the author would argue that the mental condition of the characters at that time made his scenario plausible, and what more can you ask for?

Platinum Member

Discovry
30964 Posts
3/04
Posted - Jan 19 2006 : 10:40PM
Watch out, the administration is subpenoing (sp?) internet records randomly, it might look like you want to learn how to start your own nuclear weapons program.

Senior Member

6166 Posts
10/02
Posted - Jan 20 2006 : 1:16AM
That's hilarious! I used to check Amazon every couple of weeks for the release date before I found GRRM's website. I went to one of his book signings when AFFC was released and something like 500-600 people showed up. It was great, he's a real funny dude.

Senior Member

Thread Killer
5479 Posts
10/05
Posted - Jan 20 2006 : 2:02AM
FYI. Amazon only updates publication release dates if the publishers/record companies/movie studios proactively contact them. Then it goes from the buyers, then to the catalog department (online), then to customer service (which used to be me, but is now about 4 people) to inform the customer that the release date has been postponed. With over 13 million items in their catalog, they can't possibly be proactive.

P.S. In 6 months, my confidentiality/non-competition agreement with Amazon.com will expire. I will write my memoir at that time.

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Senior Member

6399 Posts
6/05
Posted - Jan 20 2006 : 2:04AM
Confessions of A Video Vixen Karrine 'Supahead' Steffans(in addition to following along on the CD pack).

Im looking into a number of titles for my next books:

*Stepin Fetchit by Mel Watkins

*The G-String Murders by Gypsy Rose Lee

*Oedipus Revisited: the Sexual Behaviour in the Human Male Today by Shere Hite

*Lady Franklin's Revenge by Ken McGoogan

*Story of Chicago May by Nuala O'Faolain


Member

845 Posts
4/05
Posted - Jan 20 2006 : 8:31AM
Who's the author of that Devinn? And what genre is that book in?

Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Jan 25 2006 : 7:13PM
Bad Trip: How the War Against Drugs is Destroying America --by Joel Miller

Excellent!

I purchased this book after reading Joel Miller's Size Matters . I have read many books regarding drug legalization and the drug war. I was curious as to whether or not this book would be able to offer something new. About midway through the book I did feel that it was offering something different. Even the most ardent proponent of drug prohibition must realize that the methods used to enforce the law are a severe threat to society. This is the book to give to your 'conservative' friends and family members. Just hope that they don't close the book early on because it is pro-legalization. The real strength comes later on when Miller starts to really delve into ways our constitutional rights have been violated, especially the 4th and 5th amendments. Any fan of the Constitution will be saddened to see how the Drug Law has eroded the Constitution. The real beauty comes at the end when Miller recommends family and the Church as the best means to curb the drug problem, or at least leaving the decisions to the states rather than the federal government.

So there you have it...a drug legalization book that supports the Constitution, the family, the Church, and State's Rights.

Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!


Member

311 Posts
6/05
Posted - Jan 25 2006 : 7:43PM
The War Against Cliché: Essays and Reviews, Martin Amis.
 
All-Star Member

"liable to deprave and corrupt"
5501 Posts
5/04
Posted - Jan 25 2006 : 8:20PM
Doing some Lovecraft short stories at the moment.

Jacco

 
All-Star Member

4497 Posts
3/05
Posted - Jan 25 2006 : 8:24PM
"An Unseemly Man" by Larry Flynt
 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Jan 25 2006 : 10:33PM
Well, it's nice that somebody finally noticed.

Platinum Member

Discovry
30964 Posts
3/04
Posted - Jan 25 2006 : 11:12PM
Its been documented in the news as various methods of search and siezure is okayed.

Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Jan 26 2006 : 7:16AM
Hardware, Croy, I was a bit short with my review. I wanted to say more than "excellent" but I did not want to devote an hour to writing it up. People have written of these Constitutional violations before. I have one book that lists violations of practically every Ammendment in the Bill of Rights. I just think that Miller does a very good job of presenting the material and showing that regardless if a person thinks that using or buying drugs is a big sin, they still should consider the fact that these infringements don't just affect the 'guilty'.

I should also admit that this book is quite bold in that it does not really 'test the water' with marijuana. This is a book against the drug war, not just the war on marijuana.

Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!


Platinum Member

Discovry
30964 Posts
3/04
Posted - Jan 26 2006 : 9:54PM
The author should have a field day with Bush's comment that FIA was written in the '70s, that it is now 2006, and FIA is outdated so what the hell?

Also, with the slow erosion of Rights, people seem not to notice or care much. My comment wasn't about the book, just that the facts stare them in the face and people seem to ignore them. I understand, though don't approve, of why those born here are like that. I just don't understand why those who immigrated from places who wanted to taste freedom don't do more.

Edited by - croy on 1/26/2006 9:56:56 PM

Lost Horizon
Deactivated User

1468 Posts
6/05
Posted - Jan 27 2006 : 7:19PM
Just finished The Successor by Ismail Kadare.

I wouldn't put it in the very first rank of his novels: it seems rather slight compared to some of his weightier early works and the translation reads rather clunkily in places. But there are profound, exquisite moments in this novel that make it all worthwhile. Kadare's ability to take the reader completely into the mind and being of one of his characters in just a few brief lines is second to none.

The story is set in Albania in the last years of Enver Hoxha (although that name is never used, he is always "The Guide" or just "Himself "). The Guide's Designated Successor is found dead from a gunshot in his bedroom; it is reported as suicide but soon rumours that it was murder emerge. As the months pass, rumour and counter-rumour swirl about Tirana and also through the foreign intelligence agencies trying hopelessly to understand the Albanian situation. The novel shows us how different people are caught up in the aftermath of the Successor's death - his family, particularly his daughter; his architect; the Minister of the Interior; and the Guide himself. We also learn of the events in the months preceding the murder. In the final chapter the reader is even addressed by the shade of the Successor himself. But the mystery of the Successor's death remains unresolved - indeed, if anything, the more information we are given the more confused things become.

All this is reminiscent of an earlier Kadare novel, The Concert, through which were scattered radically different interpretations of how one of Mao's ministers might have actually died, which all served to emphasise the unknowability of things and the groundlessness of life under a paranoid dictatorship. But whereas in The Concert (my favourite Kadare novel) this was only one part of a more substantial and wide-ranging story (a story, indeed, of positively Tolstoyan breadth), here the mystery of the Successor's death is itself the substance of the novel.

All in all, a good - though not great - novel by one of the greatest writers alive today.


Senior Member

Somewhere in Yellowjacketland
41895 Posts
10/00
Posted - Jan 27 2006 : 10:34PM
I'm catching up on books I haven't read in Sue Grafton's "alphabet" mystery series. Last ones were "A is for Alibi" and "C is of Corpse".

My favourite so far are "Q is for Quarry" and "B is for Burglar".

I've read quite a few (maybe still 5 or 6 left to read) and I must say there is not a weak one so far, good stuff!


Sex Object by Proxy

"We all want our time in Hell."
3095 Posts
8/04
Posted - Jan 27 2006 : 10:54PM
It seems to me that the stories have lost their sense of time. IIRC, the events of the last book took place in 1987, but I just didn't get any sense of it while reading the book. I think Sue Grafton really needs to re-acquaint herself with 80's pop culture.

Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Jan 28 2006 : 3:56AM
croy, could be a very discussion, but I don't want to get this thread too off track.

Disabling America: The Unintended Consequences of the Government's Protection of the Handicapped --Greg Perry

I was doing a search for books about unintended consequences and ran across this one. Since someone close to me is paraplegic I felt intrigued to buy the book. Despite the fact that I should know better I sometimes allow myself to assume some laws are actually good(Maybe I do this to make myself slightly unpredictable), but throw me a bone suggesting that something called the Americans With Disabilities Act is a bad law and I just have to bite.

Most here know that I am a libertarian. Just exactly how hard-core I would be rated, I don't know. But I think I am capable of setting certain ideals aside if the law works. But it is tough to convince me because I look at unintended consequences and other things that many are not as well trained to see (not that I am the greatest expert). Heck! My signature would probably not be there if I thought the drug war worked. Does the ADA 'work'? Well, I guess it does if you consider creating more victims, giving bureaucrats things to do, and lining the pockets of attorneys as 'working'. My conclusion is not fully formulated by this one writing, but you won't hear me defending the ADA. (This does not provide sufficient data, but then again I'm not sure how badly it is needed. Afterall, the fact that the law has not increased the employment of handicapped people in 15 years, makes a strong case for it being a bad law. I'd also be interested in hearing what the aforementioned paralyzed person thinks of the book.)

I knew nothing of Greg Perry prior to reading this book. I didn't fully know what to expect. I ended up wandering into the path of a lover of the free market, much like myself. Yet, had you asked me before reading the book I might have said that the ADA was a good way to correct market imperfections. Of course I would have based that on very little information other than "the name sounds good". I think I ran into the book expecting Perry to recomment certain tweeks to the current law, but was surprised to find that his solution is to get rid of the law entirely.

In ways I would have preferred that the book were more condensed. There is some side-tracking. He makes it clear that he is a Christian libertarian (best I can tell. No mention of drugs, porn, etc.), anti-abortion, pro-NRA, and pro-home schooling. I can criticize him for his lapse in economics when he says that home schooling only costs $15.99 a year. I think it best not to promote economic thinking for most of the book then avoid it when convenient.

For those interested for whatever reason, I found to some of Greg Perry's writings. (Since the link is from LewRockwell.com I will assume he is a Christian libertarian.)

Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!


Senior Member

Somewhere in Yellowjacketland
41895 Posts
10/00
Posted - Jan 28 2006 : 5:40PM
I think she does pretty good, although maybe not as good in "S is for Silence" but there are so many flashbacks to the fifties it's hard to tell.

Platinum Member

Discovry
30964 Posts
3/04
Posted - Jan 28 2006 : 10:45PM
'dorphin, does Disabling America cover the expansion of the legal/bureaucratic definition of 'disabled'?

Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Jan 29 2006 : 3:13AM
Croy, yes he does, though not as much as expected or would have liked. I did expect that a large part of the book would be dedicated to abuses of the term 'disabled'. And while that is presented, it is not the focal point, by far. I think the reason may be that Perry even did not approve of the law if it could be rewritten to only include people that we traditionally consider handicapped. For example: the blind, the paraplegic, and the deaf.

I'll stop here since I answered your question. If you would like to discuss the ADA, start a new thread and I would be happy to contribute some of my thoughts.

Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!


Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Feb 1 2006 : 12:06AM
Junk Science Judo: Self-Defense Against Health Scares and Scams by Steven Milloy

You've heard the saying "question everything", but that can be hard to do without knowing what kind of questions to ask. This book serves as good resource to help you know what questions to ask when you hear "a recent study shows" and reminds you that most studies are open to criticism and should be a step towards knowing but usually aren't the final word. The next time the media, corporations, activists groups, or the government feed me science I will be better equipped to ask if anything really has been proven. I recommend that others read it and share their opinion.

Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!

 
All-Star Member

Your other left
28335 Posts
3/02
Posted - Feb 1 2006 : 12:31AM
They aren't feeding you science, they're feeding you statistical analyses. A little research will show that even mathematicians have problems performing accurate statistical analyses... that's why lies, damn lies and statistics is a phrase that's always relevant.

Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Feb 1 2006 : 1:20AM
Hardware, Lesson 3: Statistics Aren't Science pretty much says what you said.

I agree, however I should say that I hold a study in higher regards than a non-study. Economic analysis most often will not meet the pure criteria of 'science', but that same criticism is pertinent to the pro-government regulation types as well as the free-market types. Personally, I think a greater burden of proof is needed for government.

Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!


Luminary

6885 Posts
3/00
Posted - Feb 9 2006 : 1:49AM
Why Unions Matter? by Michael D Yates.

I am far from pro-union so I decided to pick up this book to give me a more positive impression of unions. This wasn't the book. I am sure that there are better arguments than presented in this book. It got off to a really bad start. I had many criticisms of the first chapter and Yate's objectivity and or credibility was all but lost.

Let me give you an example. "A good 90 percent of the people own nothing, while a fraction of the rest own everything." Nothing? Nothing is equivalent to 0, but I will allow a bit of a stretch. So I did research. I used the State of Working America 2004/2005 . Yates cited an earlier edition of the book. His sentence does not give me much of a clue as to what figure he was actually referring to, but I will give a few measures of ownership.

Distribution of asset ownership across households 2001:
Bottom 90%: 28.5% of total net worth of all HH.
Math question: is 28.5% equal to 0?

Distribution of stock market holdings by wealth class 2001:
Bottom 90%: about 23% (greater than 0)

I am not sure where he got 90% of people own nothing. Granted there is inequality in the US, but there is also inequality between 0 and 23%. Granted I did not use the 96/97 edition. Maybe things really have improved tremendously since then. Oddly enough union membership as a percent of workers has declined since then.

He also mentions the plight of a worker only making $400 a month. Keep in mind that this is an economic educator. $400 a month is $100 per week. Not likely in 1998 (the year the book was published) a full time worker was making less than $100 per week, the minimum wage forbids it (in many cases). So he was most likely talking about a part time worker (how part-time?) or the story is from many years ago? As an economic educator it would be nice if he put the figures in real numbers, or at least gave the year so that other economic educators could put it in perspective.

The fault of this book is largely seen early in the form of an 'ism' and that 'ism' is classism. This is evidenced early on but the best evidence comes later. He is a fan of the labor movement, and according to him "a labor movement is, by definition, a movement of those that oppose employers." Sad attitude to have if you ask me. Us vs them. But I am never sure who us is. When I hear the term 'workers' I notice that the composition of which seems to change to fit the argument. To add numbers it includes all people who work and possibly the unemployed, but when someone just wants to do there job and not be bothered by the union they are not one of 'the workers'. The workers are never fully defined, so as not visibly excluded people, but careful reading gives the impression that some people who work are not amongst the workers.

Employers are at fault, and creatively. Early on employers are accused training workers how to do all tasks so that they can easily dismiss an employee. Later on he creatively insinuates that the capitalist notion of specialization is a tool to keep an unemployed group of people as a 'reserve army' to spread fear to the unemployed.

Many causes for unemployment are not addressed. I notice that he excluded Henry Ford's efficiency wage. I could present the argument that it creates unemployment and creates a 'reserve army'. Due to above market wages current employees work harder to maintain their jobs, however less workers are hired than if the wage had been lower. Of course he would not give emphasis to this argument.

On occasion he does mention unemployment as a concern but neglects the impact that unions have had on unemployment. He praises the Fair Labor Standards Act, but makes no mention of the 2000 blacks who lost their jobs shortly after the minimum wage was imposed. Most unemployment results from government, usually influenced by unions.

Praise is given to Europe pro-worker policies, but he fails to mention that the unemployment rate is higher in many European countries than it is in the US. The US economy is blamed for unemployment, but Europe gets a pass. No explanation given. I am reminded of one of his arguments for the union: the union gives the members a sense of respect. I can agree to some extent, though sometimes they just end up being a bunch of whiners. Some think that being employed gives someone a sense of respect. They earned what they got, even if it is not much. Does unemployment as a result of union action rob someone of a sense of respect?

Let me examine a couple of Yate's proposals in the end:

He proposes that employment should be a right. However, earlier on he looks unfavorably upon Right to Work Laws.

He demands wage and income equality. He says he can think of no 'good reason' why he should earn four times as much as the people clean who clean the building where he teaches. Nice semantics. Had he left out the word 'good' he would have had to really been challenged on it. 'Good' offers a convenient escape route. Without good he would be way too open to critique.

We all have our biases, but this is a bias that I can point out even further than I have. Where is the Clayton Act? Where is the Davis Bacon Act? He doesn't treat the unions as perfect, but he conceals many arguments against unions. I hope this isn't the best book that the pro-union crowd can present.

BTW, I do not employ anyone. Even if current labor laws were removed I still might not employ anyone, but I do know that the higher the cost of hiring someone, the less likely it will be that I will employ someone. In this book, the employer is almost treated as evil, but I get no sense that the employer should be gotten rid of. The employer is treated as a different group of people that has greater responsibility and less rights. I think that all who propose greater restrictions on employers should take a moment to ponder how things would be different if we required people once they reached a certain age to be employers and abide by those laws.


Molon Labe...Oh! And! FREE THE WEED!!!

Edited by - Endorphin on 2/9/2006 1:50:16 AM


Senior Member

Thread Killer
5479 Posts
10/05
Posted - Feb 9 2006 : 5:30AM
I'm finally reading Memoirs of a Geisha, and I'm burning through it.

Member

San Pornando Valley
432 Posts
12/05
Posted - Feb 9 2006 : 12:06PM
"The Doll's House" part of the Sandman Chronicles by Neil Gaiman... fucking badness, graphic novel style. The mythology in this storyline is intense and capturing.

Member

Sweden
675 Posts
3/03
Posted - Feb 9 2006 : 12:33PM
The Sandman comics are excellent. I wish I had the money to follow the series. I've only read the first couple of books. They are awfully expensive.
 
All-Star Member

SAMCRO
17126 Posts
8/00
Posted - Feb 9 2006 : 1:28PM
Just finished Lion's Game by Nelson DeMille and it was a very good read. I then moved on to Cell which is the new one by Stephen King and so far it's not bad but I just got into it.

B-I-G-m-i-k-e

6167 Posts
3/01
Posted - Feb 9 2006 : 1:59PM
Thanks astroknight, you reminded me of a quote I wrote and forgot about:
But to answer the question, I haven't read any books completely in a long time, just lots of parts of books, and mostly stuff I forgot. I am not a huge book reading fan, I like magazines on any and every subject more.

- -B -I -G -m -i -k -e, here and there, over and out! - -

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