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All smartbuydisc.rus > World News Nonsense > School repossesses lunches from students
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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 3:00AM
The kids were told they have a zero balance or deficit on their lunch payments.
The school's lame excuse was that they couldn't tell whether the balance was negative until the food was rung up. [hint: fix your software]
Question: Why not discretely make a note of which kids have negative balances, allow the kids to eat in peace, and then contact the parents as would be acceptable, professional behavior?
I was aggravated to see that this has happened in schools in various other states as well.
Boogie With Stu
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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 4:26AM
What can you even say after reading something like this? [o\|]
 
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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 4:41AM
You would think the elementary school principal would have stepped in and stopped this from occurring. On a lighter note, saw the children protesting on the news and they seemed to be having a good time. Bottom line, there is no need to humiliate a child over a few dollars.

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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 10:29AM
Utah is a different world, been there and saw no reason to go back.

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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 10:45AM
When I was in school if you didn't pack a lunch from home and you weren't on the free lunch program, you had to buy a "lunch ticket" at the beginning of the week, or pay with dollars and cents in the morning when the teacher took attendance and asked "Who is buying lunch today?". If you didn't you went hungry. I went hungry most days. I wasn't happy, but it didn't kill me and nobody gave a damn. I wasn't the only one, either.
The school is not required to feed your kids. You are.
The school sent out notices and contacted parents to tell them the kids had no money in their accounts - the parents did not pay for their kids to be fed.
There are plenty of times you can't get parents to act unless their kids are in the way of harm (emotional harm in this case - the kids were embarrassed).
The only real shame here is that the food was wasted. The school should have a better way to track who can't pay than to wait until the food is issued to charge for it.
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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 11:37AM
^ For far too many children in the richest nation in history, a school lunch is the only decent meal they eat all day.

Kimi, I understand your points about paying for it, and I don't necessarily disagree.

HOWEVER, any way you slice this story it was wrong.
Furthermore, taking the food away from these children and throwing it away -- all done in front of their fellow classmates -- is humiliating, and will scar these children.
Yeah, yeah, yeah, they'll get over it.
But, does anyone ever really get over being called-out as worthless in front of their peers?

I'm guessing that, in [link deactivated:Server error]91.8% White[/url] (and only 1.3% Black) Utah, this has a chance of being discussed on the merits, without the usual suspects derailing this into our typical partisan media-scripted racism narratives.

Erica Lukes, one of the parents whose child was affected

[mod edit: no pics with kids in them]

Edited by - killbillvol69 on 7/20/2019 1:44:20 AM


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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 3:14PM
^ I'm looking at the girl.
Kimi said:
Just as an aside -- did you know that some schools don't allow kids to bring a lunch from home (peanut allergies and all that) and/or charge they the parents a 'junk food' fee if they do?
No, they STARTED to contact SOME parents, but they claimed that for the other kids, there was no way of knowing if they had a zero balance until after they rang up the food.
Some of them were not contacted. If someone has kids at several schools, using different payment systems, and other things to do, they need to be notified. A lot of this is due to the schools adopting their own peculiar systems where cash isn't allowed and you have to pay via cell phone, or you can't pay via cell phone, or whatever.
Personally, I think it would be fine for the schools to be responsible for your kids being fed while they are there (they were in England when I went to school there). Our local elementary rural school in the U.S. (90 students) is in a poverty zone, with over 90% of the kids qualifying for free lunch, so they gave ALL the kids a free lunch -- it was quicker AND CHEAPER than dealing with a whole system for managing paperwork and punch cards for eligible students, and fee schedules for the 9 or so kids that would have had to pay, and it was more humane.
But I have no quibble with paid lunches or billing the parents. My quibble is, if you've given kids the food, they eat it, and THEN you take this up with the parents. Any douche should know you don't hand out lunches, and then go up to dozens of kids and publicly confiscate their lunches to shame them. It was heinous.
And the suggestion that it is the school's responsibility to figure out who owes and contact the parents solves the problem completely. Punishing kids because your software sucks and you are unable to handle billing on whatever dumbass system you designed is ridiculous.

Edited by - Pieps on 2/1/2014 3:22:46 PM

Boogie With Stu
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Posted - Feb 1 2014 : 6:12PM
Nail on the head. But even if somebody wanted to justify this in any way whatsoever, the article also stated:

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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 11:07AM
Yeah, I see the picture of the kid, too. Her hair is styled, she has on make-up and earrings and she doesn't look underfed.
That's a far cry from what *I* would have looked like if that had been a picture of me in school at that age. I qualified for the free lunch program, my mother couldn't be bothered to fill out the forms, even after the school(s) sent home multiple notices to inform her that I almost never had a lunch or breakfast. When I was in elementary school we didn't eat in a cafeteria, we ate at our desks in our classroom. The school had breakfast and a lunch program. There's nothing quite like sitting there with your head down and your stomach growling while everyone around you eats and they ALL know you haven't got anything - twice a day, every day, for nine months straight, year after year. It was better when I was in jr. high - in the cafeteria my friends would share what they had with me, or give me their leftovers of stuff they didn't want - I ate a lot of lima beans.
None of that is the fault of the school. It's MY MOTHER'S fault. SHE was responsible for feeding me, not the school. I was embarrassed and hungry because MY MOTHER fucked up, not because the school was evil and intended me to be humiliated in front of my peers. These parents that don't keep track of whether their kid has a lunch balance or whatever, this shit is THEIR fault, not the school's fault.
When the school makes a mistake about who has money and who doesn't, then it's the school's fault - and that's bullshit because none of this should be electronic cards and bullcrap that just wastes everyone's time and money anyhow.

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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 12:28PM
I don't know why you think that that should be alright with the school. That is not the standard for how kids are treated. In fact, schools are supposed to report any suspected abuse to the authorities, and that it in the zone.
No matter how you frame this relative to how badly you were treated as a child, it is not a reason to treat other kids badly.
And they were treated badly.
That girl above might have a very nice life. For her, this is a disruption and an upset of how she sees the world. I don't think there's any hurry to give kids the message that nobody cares about them. It is not the job of the school to mistreat kids so they develop a thick skin.
The school has a defective means of verifying which parents have to be notified. They need to fix their software and actually notify the parents. If they can only verify it by giving kids food, then *SIMPLY* the kids eat the food, and THEN the school contacts the parents.
The kids are not supposed to take the punishment if the school has a shitty system and the parents aren't contacted. It is not a goal to punish children for the inaction of their parents.
We are not trying to create a system that aspires to the worst possible behavior toward kids. It's supposed to create the best environment for them.
That school is in a race to the bottom.

Edited by - Pieps on 2/2/2014 9:07:48 PM


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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 1:16PM
Maybe this is aberrant, but I'm telling you, there is this cultural omnipresence of high-handedness and moral retribution that casts a shadow over everything Utah.
Boogie With Stu
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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 3:27PM
^ I get that, and that's why this story didn't really surprise me as much as it probably should have. But what about Massachusetts, Indiana, Kentucky (I know, I know), and Maine? They were listed at the bottom of the article.
And nothing I have read justifies punishing children like this. Leave the grown-up problems for the "adults" to handle and deal with. These kids (and all children) will have to deal with this type of bullshit soon enough in their lives. And yes, some unfortunately already do. But there's no need to accelerate it, especially at school.

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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 5:12PM
I don't advocate abusing children, and I can't figure if you think missing a single meal or being embarrassed qualifies as abuse or not - it sure doesn't to me. I'm willing to be wrong on that score, but it doesn't matter anyway.
It is not the responsibility of schools to feed children. It is not their responsibility to clothe them, give them healthcare, or shelter them either. It's just not. There are a LOT of parents out there that will not act on behalf of their offspring unless they are made to do so. These kids should have just not been given any meal at all, and they should have been told first thing in the morning so they had the opportunity to call their parents and tell them they would have no lunch - incorrect balance or not. I haven't disagreed that the school needs a better method for tracking who is out of money and who is not. Otherwise, I'm sticking to my opinion, the only real issue here is that the food was wasted.
This is part of what is wrong with our education system. Lack of parental responsibility has led to this nonsense.
 
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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 5:17PM
The entire country and our social contract is in a "race to the bottom."
We're moving towards Lord of the Flies, The Hunger Games and Nineteen Eighty-Four at an alarming rate.
As a child of the 1950's/1960's -- the American economic boom, post WWII -- I never thought this country would be where we are today!
And, the ball is gathering steam as we hurtle to the bottom.
We didn't just fight two wars (i.e. WWII, both Atlantic and Pacific theatres), but we rebuilt Japan, Germany and Europe...
We educated an entire generation (the G.I. Bill), created a middle-class and helped them buy homes and raise families on a decent wage...
Fought and largely won the battle for civil rights...
We put a man on the moon...
We fought and won the Cold War...
And, much, much more...
We grew the pie for almost everyone.
Now, we "can't afford" to educate our children, honor our commitments or help the less fortunate.
This school lunch fiasco is just another example of how low we have sunk.
And, even with this, we have partisan idiots (NOT referring to anyone on ADT) picking sides and arguing about it.
Really?
Do we not even know right from wrong anymore?
IronEyesCody.jpg
Edited by - Goldstein on 2/2/2014 5:57:57 PM

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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 5:43PM
Kimi said:
It qualifies as mistreatment. I don't think it's going to be the worst trauma these kids are ever exposed to, or anything. But it's not excusable to give the lunch and then take it. It was mishandled, botched, wrong.
It's not wrong to not get your kid a bicycle for Christmas (that's up to you), but it's wrong to put the bicycle under the tree (clumsily wrapped for extra anticipation), let him take it around the block, and then explain (preferably in front of his friends) that he can't keep it, and destroy the bike or walk it to the trash. I know that's an exaggeration, but it makes my point. Feed the kid or don't (it's a different matter) but don't give and then take away. That's the problem, and I don't care why they did it.
There is no standard for when it's okay to pointlessly mistreat a child. If the kid is already treated badly in other ways, that doesn't make it okay to mistreat him. If the kid is enjoying a lovely, perfect, airbrushed, rainbow fairies life and hasn't had her share of strife, it's not okay to mistreat her. If their parents are shit, it's not okay to mistreat the kid. It just wasn't okay to handle it that way.
Edited by - Pieps on 2/2/2014 9:01:00 PM
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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 5:51PM
Why do we have a school lunch program, then?
[link inactive:404 - Page not found]National School Lunch Program (fact sheet)
(This is current factual information.)
NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM
1. What is the National School Lunch Program?
The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 100,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provided nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 31 million children each school day in 2012.
The Food and Nutrition Service administers the program at the Federal level. At the State level, the National School Lunch Program is usually administered by State education agencies, which operate the program through agreements with school food authorities.
2. How does the National School Lunch Program work?
Generally, public or nonprofit private schools of high school grade or under and public or nonprofit private residential child care institutions may participate in the school lunch program. School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the lunch program get cash subsidies and USDA foods from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price lunches to eligible children. School food authorities can also be reimbursed for snacks served to children through age 18 in afterschool educational or enrichment programs.
3. What are the nutritional requirements for school lunches?
School lunchs must meet meal pattern and nutrition standards based on the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The current meal pattern increases the availability of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in the school menu. The meal pattern’s dietary specifications set specific calorie limits to ensure age-appropriate meals for grades K-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Other meal enhancements include gradual reductions in the sodium content of the meals (sodium targets must be reached by SY 2014-15, SY 2017-18 and SY 2022-23). While school lunches must meet Federal meal requirements, decisions about what specific foods to serve and how they are prepared are made by local school food authorities.
4. How do children qualify for free and reduced price meals?
Any child at a participating school may purchase a meal through the National School Lunch Program. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free meals. Those with incomes between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level are eligible for reduced-price meals, for which students can be charged no more than 40 cents. (For the period July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2014, 130 percent of the poverty level is $30,615 for a family of four; 185 percent is $43,568 .)
Children from families with incomes over 185 percent of poverty pay a full price, though their meals are still subsidized to some extent. Local school food authorities set their own prices for full-price (paid) meals, but must operate their meal services as non-profit programs.
Afterschool snacks are provided to children on the same income eligibility basis as school meals. However, programs that operate in areas where at least 50 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals may serve all their snacks for free.
5. How much reimbursement do schools get?
Most of the support USDA provides to schools in the National School Lunch Program comes in the form of a cash reimbursement for each meal served. The current (July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015) basic cash reimbursement rates if school food authorities served less than 60% free and reduced price lunches during the second preceding school year are:
Free lunches: $2.93 Reduced-price lunches: $2.53 Paid lunches: $0.28
Free snacks: $0.80 Reduced-price snacks: $0.40 Paid snacks: $0.07

School food authorities that are certified to be in compliance with the updated meal requirements will receive an additional six cents of federal cash reimbursement for each meal served. This bonus will be adjusted for inflation in subsequent years. These above rates exclude the additional six cents. Higher reimbursement rates are also in effect for Alaska and Hawaii, and for schools with high percentages of low-income students.
For the latest reimbursement rates visit FNS website at

6. What other support do schools get from USDA?
In addition to cash reimbursements, schools are entitled by law to receive USDA foods, called "entitlement" foods, at a value of 23.25 cents for each meal served in Fiscal Year 2012-2013. Schools can also get "bonus" USDA foods as they are available from surplus agricultural stocks.

Through Team Nutrition USDA provides schools with technical training and assistance to help school food service staffs prepare healthful meals, and with nutrition education to help children understand the link between diet and health.
7. What types of foods do schools get from USDA?
States select entitlement foods for their schools from a list of various foods purchased by USDA and offered through the school lunch program. Bonus foods are offered only as they become available through agricultural surplus. The variety of both entitlement and bonus USDA foods schools can get from USDA depends on quantities available and market prices.
A very successful project between USDA and the Department of Defense (DoD) has helped provide schools with fresh produce purchased through DoD. USDA has also worked with schools to help promote connections with local small farmers who may be able to provide fresh produce.
8. How many children have been served over the years?
In 1946, the National School Lunch Act created the modern school lunch program, though USDA had provided funds and food to schools for many years prior to 1946. About 7.1 million children were participating in the National School Lunch Program by the end of its first year, 1946-47. By 1970, 22 million children were participating, and by 1980 the figure was nearly 27 million. In 1990, over 24 million children ate school lunch every day. In Fiscal Year 2012, more than 31.6 million children each day got their lunch through the National School Lunch Program. Since the modern program began, more than 224 billion lunches have been served.
9. How much does the program cost?
The National School Lunch Program cost $11.6 billion in FY 2012. By comparison, the lunch program's total cost in 1947 was $70 million; in 1950, $119.7 million; in 1960, $225.8 million; in 1970, $565.5 million; in 1980, $3.2 billion; in 1990, $3.7 billion; and in 2000, 6.1 billion.
For more information:
For information on the operation of the National School Lunch Program and all the Child Nutrition Programs, contact the State agency in your state that is responsible for the administration of the programs. A listing of all our State agencies may be found on our web site at , select your State from the drop down box and select “apply.”
You may also contact us through the Communication Division at 703-305-2281, or by mail at 3101 Park Center Drive, Suite 926, Alexandria, Virginia 22302.
September 2013

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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 6:26PM
It is a different issue, but I favor free school lunches, and I'm happy to pay my share toward that.
The school I went to in England was free lunch for everybody. It was a hot, wet, plentiful lunch of filling stuff like shepherd's pie, overcooked vegetables, and tapioca pudding.
There was one boy at the school, and only one, who went back for seconds, and he took seconds of everything, and he did it every single day. He ate his food in a big hurry so he could get back up there before the cafeteria ladies closed up shop for the day. I'm sure it was apparent to everyone that he got no food at home. The food was 100% hot sticky mushy stuff, so you couldn't pocket any for later. I'll bet weekends were really rough for him. I never heard one student mention any of this to the kid or to anyone else in my presence. The cafeteria ladies served up the second portion of food without comment or condescension, the same as if it was anybody going through the first time. I loved that. It was probably all-in-all the best tax dollar spent at that school every day.
The last school I sub taught at had a free breakfast for all the kids before school started. It was just a six foot table with a few simple things - maybe a few dozen each of bananas, small cartons of milk, and bagels. Not all of the kids wander by and take something. It's very casual. Some kids take some days and not others. Maybe they rushed out of the house late to catch their bus, and missed breakfast at home. Who cares? It's a small investment, nothing luxurious, and it's good insurance for kids being alert in class. There's no earthly reason to keep track of who took a banana.
 
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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 7:41PM
It is a related issue, and absolutely intertwined with the discussion we're having.
Of course parents are supposed to do their part in seeing that their children receive their NSLP-supported school lunch -- whether it be a free lunch, reduced-price lunch or a "full-price" lunch (which is still subsidized by the NSLP).
So, what's appropriate when parents fail to be responsible parents? Punish the children?
The National School Lunch Act (79 P.L. 396, 60 Stat. 230) is a United States federal law that created the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) to provide low-cost or free school lunch meals to qualified students through subsidies to schools.
If schools suspect children of being abused, they are expected to [link inactive:404 - Page not found]report child abuse and neglect.
Yet, in the case of children going hungry, it's OK to look the other way, make feeble incompetent attempts to investigate and remedy the situation, and, if all else fails, simply refuse to feed them?
This is unacceptable!
And, the NSLP exists to support the premise that school-age children in the United States don't go hungry.
What if a well-off family's parents were irresponsible and forgot or refused to pay for their child's school lunch?
Is it then acceptable to "blame the parents" and refuse to feed the children?
I don't think so!
Coming back to the Utah situation at hand:
It should be (and a very good legal case can be made that it is) the school's responsibility to investigate and remedy any issues relating to every child's receiving their school lunch.
If the parents are the problem, legal tools exist to remedy that.
Regardless -- and in every situation and with every child -- all children should continue to receive their school lunch without interruption.
After the matter is properly investigated, we can then decide who is going to be responsible to pay, and how much (i.e. free, reduced-cost or full-price), and remedy the situation.
If properly investigated and followed-up on, many different possible results exist, including:
(1) The child's family income already qualifies the child for a free lunch
(2) The child's family income qualifies the child for a reduced-price lunch (which students can be charged no more than 40 cents)
(3) The child's family income qualifies the child for a full-price paid lunch
If the child's family can afford to pay, yet doesn't for whatever reason, the laws and means exist to force them to do so.

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Posted - Feb 2 2014 : 9:33PM
I grew up and went to public school and got reduced lunch from elementary to high school.
This is really dumb. If these accounts were past due (negative), fine, but don't penalize the kid and also it's frigin food. It's not like a discretionary thing. Give them the food, then notify the parents who are responsible to pay for the account, but don't penalize the kid.
The reduced lunches helped my brother, sisters and me (all in school), since our family was below the poverty line.
I find this really pathetic, they took away the food cause of their negative accounts and penalized the kids. It's food for Christ sakes. Only in the good ole USA.

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Posted - Feb 4 2014 : 11:38AM
Throwing out the food showed an incredible level of ignorance. If the food is going to be thrown in the garbage can anyway, then it makes sense to let someone eat it. There are too many people going hungry to justify such a stupid maneuver. The arrogance of humans is sometimes beyond normal belief.

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Posted - Feb 4 2014 : 5:28PM
Because we have farm subsidies and people feel sorry for poor kids but don't want to give poor adults money that they might spend "on something else".
That the schools are used to distribute the subsidized food to the impoverished children doesn't make the schools responsible for feeding all the children.
 
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Posted - Feb 4 2014 : 5:46PM

I cannot Judge this case, I went in a private religious school and I didn't pay for food , I went home for lunch , I lived some 150 yards from school and I only had to cross the road once to go there , with an officer at the crossing.
Even though both my parents were at work there was someone paid to prepare our lunches (I have two brothers)
The only thing I can't really get is why waste the food I mean that way the school paid for it anyway , so why waste it , let 'em eat and tell them that was the last until payment was received or proof of payment if their software wasn't updated.
Edit removed bullshit due to misreading
Edited by - LCF on 2/4/2014 6:01:38 PM

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Posted - Feb 4 2014 : 6:45PM
This happens in the UK too,a 6 year old got expelled over having a packet of mini cheddars in their lunch box.
 
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Posted - Feb 5 2014 : 9:19AM
It's clearly unrelated with sex , but it just occurred to me that the picture of the girl above might be not allowed here.

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Posted - Apr 7 2017 : 9:42PM
Edited by - Pieps on 4/7/2017 9:43:55 PM
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Posted - May 1 2017 : 7:06PM
Greta did a story on lunch shaming on msnbc today.

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Posted - May 1 2017 : 7:21PM

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Posted - Jul 19 2019 : 8:56PM
<---- Which is a LIE.
Edited by - Pieps on 7/19/2019 8:57:15 PM
 
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Posted - Jul 20 2019 : 7:32AM
^There's no hope for this country. We're done.
 
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Posted - Jul 20 2019 : 11:54AM
What I really find disturbing is that they trow away the food , I mean you want it paid and this is OK, but why waste it ? they will lose their money anyway , won't they?

In my highschool they used a completely different procedure it wasn't a public school it was a private one , but the tuition was much higher than just the food , there was no separate fee, those who would eat at school would have it added to the tuition and so was the gym so that those with medical condition could refuse to pay for it.

Each month every single kid would receive an envelope to be given to our parents , it contained the balance , either telling them their payment was successfully charged or telling them to check with their bank because they couldn't process their payment, which could be a delay or actually something wrong with the bank.

An elegant way to ask for money without humiliating the kids


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Posted - Jul 20 2019 : 1:05PM
Well, over here we never miss an opportunity to humiliate the kids.

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Posted - Jul 24 2019 : 1:17AM
Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand...


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Posted - Jul 25 2019 : 11:41AM
Aaaaaand...

[url=520674]District Will Now Accept Philly CEO's Donation For Lunch Debts
[/url]

 
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Posted - Jul 25 2019 : 10:31PM
^
I found this whole story baffling. There is nothing more un-American than turning down a freebie.



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